Barry Jackson

Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter now officially own the Miami Marlins

Derek Jeter, right, stands outside of a suite after a baseball game between the Miami Marlins and the Atlanta Braves, Sun., Oct. 1, 2017, at Marlins Park in Miami. Major league owners unanimously approved the sale of the Marlins on Wednesday to an investment group led by Jeter and Bruce Sherman.
Derek Jeter, right, stands outside of a suite after a baseball game between the Miami Marlins and the Atlanta Braves, Sun., Oct. 1, 2017, at Marlins Park in Miami. Major league owners unanimously approved the sale of the Marlins on Wednesday to an investment group led by Jeter and Bruce Sherman. AP

A six-pack of Marlins notes:

• Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter now officially own the Miami Marlins. Though no announcement was made, the sale closed on Monday, though there was no ceremony with Sherman, Jeter and former owner Jeffrey Loria all in the room signing a contract.

Sherman and Jeter are expected to have a press conference as early as Tuesday.

Then they will begin filling key jobs in the organization.

Jeter has targeted Gary Denbo, the Yankees’ vice president of player development, for a high-level job with the Marlins, perhaps running baseball operations. Several people inside the Marlins expect Denbo to take the job, but that hasn’t happened as of midday Monday.

Atlanta Braves special assistant Gordon Blakeley also had been mentioned as a possibility for the Marlins’ front office. He and Denbo have a good relationship.

But Fox’s Ken Rosenthal and the New York Post’s Joel Sherman said Monday that Blakeley - who is very much involved in Braves international scouting - is involved in an MLB investigation of MLB rule breaking pertaining to the Braves’ international signings, which led to John Coppolella's resignation as Braves GM today.

Sherman reported that Blakeley is gone from the Braves because of that. So that obviously could affect Marlins’ interest in him.

Jeter is believed to have consulted his longtime friend and agent, Casey Close, for suggestions on other jobs, including someone to run the business side. Someone who met with Jeter over the summer said hiring Close was appealing to Jeter, but there is no indication that Close is ready to leave his successful agency.

Miami Marlins president David Samson talks to the media about the sale of the team and bids farewell on Sept. 28, 2017.

• Per Elias, the Marlins are the first team in major-league history to place two players within MLB’s top three in RBIs in a season while not ranking within the top ten teams in runs scored. Giancarlo Stanton finished the season as the major league’s RBI leader, with 132, while his teammate, Marcell Ozuna, ranked third with 124 runs batted in. (Nolan Arenado was sandwiched between them with 130 RBIs.) Miami’s total of 778 runs was the 11th highest in the majors this season.

• The good news, as FanRag’s Jon Heyman reported, is that left-hander Wei Yin Chen probably doesn’t need elbow surgery. Still, the Marlins can’t be sure how much he will help them next year.

• Don’t know what’s worse: The Marlins having to pay $31 million next season to two pitchers with health issues (Edinson Volquez – who will miss 2018 off Tommy John surgery - and Chen) or the fact they enter the offseason with only two proven rotation pieces (Dan Straily, Jose Urena).

Dillon Peters has potential, but Adam Conley blew his chance with a horrid September.

A group led by Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter submitted its plan to league owners to buy the club for $1.2 billion.

“The things disturbing about [Conley’s] starts are the continued drop in velocity,” Don Mattingly told me. “He was 86 mph last week. If you are going to pitch at 86, you better be pinpoint in your stuff.”

• Among Jeter’s early decisions will be whether to exercise a $2 million team option on Ichiro Suzuki. He’s the only player with a team option. Catcher A.J. Ellis is a free agent.

• Though the Marlins prefer to keep Brian Anderson at third base, they believe he could play first or second base if the roster dictates.

It will be very difficult to move Martin Prado, due $13.5 million next season.

“We’ve all been pleased with [Anderson’s] defense,” Marlins president/baseball operations Michael Hill said. “I think ultimately he will hit for power.”

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