Super Bowl

Kayvon Webster’s journey to Super Bowl began in a packed house in Opa-locka

Denver Broncos cornerback Kayvon Webster poses with Miss Universe Pia Alonzo Wurtzbach during Opening Night for the NFL Super Bowl 50 football game Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in San Jose, Calif.
Denver Broncos cornerback Kayvon Webster poses with Miss Universe Pia Alonzo Wurtzbach during Opening Night for the NFL Super Bowl 50 football game Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in San Jose, Calif. AP

Want to know who Kayvon Webster has coming to the Super Bowl from the 3-Oh-5?

You’ll need a minute. And he’ll need a deep breath.

The list is that long.

“I got my mom, my sister, my dad, my uncle, my two brothers, and two of my friends,” Webster said Thursday in the Denver Broncos defensive back’s last meeting with reporters ahead of Super Bowl 50.

And that doesn’t count the many others who will be rooting from home.

“They’re excited,” he added. “They’re putting up for me, they hope I get this ring.”

Webster is a popular guy this week, no doubt. But not just this week.

When you grew up in a home with 10 other people — at least — you’re never really alone.

Before Webster was a key special-teams player for the Broncos, before he was a standout corner at USF, before he was the Miami Herald’s Miami-Dade Defensive Player of Year, he was a kid from Opa-locka with the enormous family.

And they all seemed to live in his grandmother’s house.

“At one time, it might have been 11, with a couple of little stragglers coming in, staying there,” Webster said. “My cousins had a friend who didn’t really have a good home set-up. He stayed there. My house was a welcoming house if you needed somewhere to stay.”

If it sounds cramped, it was. The worst part was having to wait, Webster said — for dinner to be ready, for a bathroom to open up.

But the pluses outweighed the minuses. He never lacked for friends his age. They all went to school together, grew up together.

And they played together — although none was quite like Webster.

He wasn’t just one of the fastest kids at Monsignor Pace High. He was one of the fastest kids in the state.

But football was his true love, and he did it all at Pace — offense, defense and special teams. Ironically, his inspiration to take up the game came from the Broncos’ Super Bowl win over the Falcons 17 years ago.

“I loved Denver from when I was growing up,” he said. “I saw that game and started playing right after that.”

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After a heralded prep career, Webster chose USF over other suitors, and he excelled in both football and track for the Bulls.

The Broncos were impressed enough to use a third-round pick on him in 2013. In his three years as a pro, Webster has been a role player for Denver, starting just two games — both this season.

But his true value is on special teams; he earned the kicking teams’ game ball for his performance in the playoff win against the Steelers on Jan. 17.

“He’s really worked at it to become one of the top guys going right now at this time of year,” said Broncos special-teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis. “… All of our guys have really learned to play for each other. He does a lot of things that don’t show up on the field as the big, big plays. He’s doing a lot of the dirty work, which is good to see.”

Webster added: “I just want to show everybody that if you have a strong mind, you can do anything that you want to do. You’ve just got to stay focused and positive.”

And it helps to have a houseful of support.

Adam H. Beasley: 305-376-3565, @AdamHBeasley

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