Miami Dolphins

Another culture change is coming to Miami. Will Reshad Jones, others buy in?

Brian Flores: ‘We didn’t have a lot of money, but we were rich in love’

Brian Flores, the newly announced head coach for the Miami Dolphins, talks to the media about his Honduran family and growing up in Brooklyn during a press conference in Davie, Florida on Monday, February 4, 2019.
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Brian Flores, the newly announced head coach for the Miami Dolphins, talks to the media about his Honduran family and growing up in Brooklyn during a press conference in Davie, Florida on Monday, February 4, 2019.

Culture change is coming again to Miami.

It didn’t work last year, when Adam Gase brought in a bunch of older winners to teach the younger guys how to comport themselves.

So the Dolphins made moves far higher up the food chain this offseason, firing Gase and hiring Brian Flores to disinfect the organization.

And during a media blitz Tuesday, during which he appeared on several morning radio programs, Flores acknowledged that it might not be easy.

“I think changing the culture, there could be some resistance,” Flores told ProFootballTalk. “We’ll work through that. We’ll do the things that we think are necessary to help this team improve. We’ll do that on a day-to-day basis.”

One easy fix would be simply getting rid of players not on board with the team-first message.

But that’s not always possible. Take, for instance, Reshad Jones, whose contract made it impossible for the Dolphins to cut him after he refused to re-enter a game in 2018 because of hurt feelings regarding his role.

That contract is only slightly more manageable in 2019, but it would still cost the Dolphins far more against the cap to release Jones ($23.3 million) than to keep him ($17.2 million).

Assuming the Dolphins cut Ryan Tannehill this offseason, Jones (who turns 31 this year and seems to be in decline) would be the team’s most expensive player — one final parting gift from Mike Tannenbaum. It will be up to Flores to convince Jones to subjugate his ego for the betterment of the team.

Flores was also asked about how things will change with Bill Belichick, his boss the past 15 years, now that they will try to beat each other twice a year.

“My relationship with Bill will be a little bit different in that we’ll be competing with each other,” Flores said. “I’ll always have a great respect for him and I think it’ll be the same on his part. He’s been a mentor to me, he’s been great to me for 15 years, he’s been a sounding board for me, and I don’t see that changing. The only thing that changes is when we play each other, for those three or four hours we won’t like each other but that’s OK. We’re both going out to win every week. He knows that. He taught me that.”

Flores shed little light on the team’s plans at quarterback, saying only it will be a collaborative effort with general manager Chris Grier and Flores’ coaching staff.

As for what Dolphins fans should expect from him?

‘Demanding, tell the truth on a day to day basis. Transparent.”

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Adam Beasley has covered the Dolphins for the Miami Herald since 2012, and has worked for the newspaper since 2006. He is a graduate of Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Communications and has written about sports professionally since 1996.
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