Miami Dolphins

Dolphins believe they have the ammo to move into the draft's top six. But will they?

Miami Dolphins talk about what they look for in quarterbacks

Miami Dolphins VP Mike Tannenbaum and GM Chris Grier, discuss the qualities they look for in quarterbacks in the draft as they talk to the media about the upcoming 2018 Draft Day.
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Miami Dolphins VP Mike Tannenbaum and GM Chris Grier, discuss the qualities they look for in quarterbacks in the draft as they talk to the media about the upcoming 2018 Draft Day.

To get one of the best four quarterbacks in this year's class, you might need to move into the draft's top six.

The good news for the Dolphins: They believe they have the firepower to do it.

"I think there is," Dolphins general manager Chris Grier, when asked if the Dolphins have the ammo to just up five or six spots from 11. "I think you can always make a deal to move up. It all depends on how much you want to give up. You see some deals with some teams, we may think that they gave up a lot to get up there.

"And then other times, you’re like, ‘Wow, they didn’t give up enough,'" Grier continued. "If teams want to move up or down, depending on what they want to do…We had a situation here in the past where we made a trade in the first round and really didn’t give up a ton for a player. At the end of the day, I think you can move up and down fairly easily. But you also still need someone to want that player or move out of that spot."

That situation, of course, was the trade for Dion Jordan in 2013, when the Dolphins only needed to part with a second-round pick to move from 12 to 3. That, of course, ended up being a bad pick — perhaps the worst in franchise history.

Miami Dolphins VP Mike Tannenbaum and GM Chris Grier, say they are happy with QB Ryan Tannehill as they talk to the media about the upcoming 2018 Draft Day.



The Dolphins sit at 11 presently, and could try to swing a trade with the Broncos at 5 or the Colts at 6. The question is: How much would it take?

Some believe the market has already been set by the Jets. New York sent this year's first and three seconds to Indianapolis move up three spots. Tannenbaum suggested what most believe: The Jets are targeting one of the four quarterbacks with that spot.

So would the Dolphins need to at least match that to move up six spots?

Not necessarily, Tannenbaum said.

"Our guys do a great job … Brandon Shore, Dennis Locke in analytics, they do a really good job of tracking and value," Tannenbaum said. "Obviously, three 2s for three spots, it looks like one team’s targeting something. That doesn’t necessarily affect the rest of the trades. And sometimes trades before the draft have one set of criteria, whereas once you’re in the heat of the moment….My view of that is the trade chart is a great guideline, but at the end of the day, if two teams want to get something done, they’re going to get something done."

If a trade gets done — either up or back — the groundwork will be laid long before Round 1 on Thursday. Tannenbaum and Grier better keep their phone chargers close; they will be on them plenty.

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"Sometimes it will be a team saying, we will come up for two players," Tannebaum said. "And then we try to keep that alive. If we’re sitting in the second round and we call a team 10 spots ahead and say, we want to come up. If one or two guys are there, we’ll come up and we’ll give you a third. Is that enough? A lot of that has to happen before we get to that point in the draft. I think it’s a little misunderstood. For every 10 calls you make, you may get one trade done. But very rarely does a trade actually start when you’re on the clock."

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