Miami Dolphins

Quinn explains protest: America ‘killed Indians,’ was ‘built off the backs of blacks’

Arizona Cardinals quarterback Carson Palmer, bottom, fumbles the ball as he is sacked for a 7-yard loss by St. Louis Rams defensive end Robert Quinn during the first quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013, in St. Louis. The Cardinals recovered the fumble.
Arizona Cardinals quarterback Carson Palmer, bottom, fumbles the ball as he is sacked for a 7-yard loss by St. Louis Rams defensive end Robert Quinn during the first quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013, in St. Louis. The Cardinals recovered the fumble. AP

Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills has a new locker-room ally in his fight for social justice.

Defensive end Robert Quinn, acqured recently from the Rams via trade, raised a clenched fist during the playing of the national anthem to protest what he and many others see as the treatment of minorities by police.

When asked to explain his demonstration during a conference call with Miami reporters Wednesday, Quinn said the following:

“The way America was built, and the way people talk .... The president said to build a wall to keep Mexicans out. This country was built off of — they killed Indians, built off the backs of the blacks. So yet, they tell us to keep quiet. So at the end of the day, let's confront the situation and let's bring humanity and friendship and let's get rid of all the ignorance. Let's face it head-on, let's look at each other as humans. I always live by this one law: Treat each other like you want to be treated. You don't ever want to smack someone in the face and don't expect to get smacked back. It's just that simple fact. Don't treat someone bad and expect not to be treated the same way. That's just how it is.”

Quinn did not say if he planned to continued his protest in 2018. Stills was several Dolphins to kneel during the anthem in protest the last several years, but the only one left on the roster to do it regularly.

Quinn’s comments came late in a revealing 10-minute call with reporters, one that made clear he has no plans to hold his tongue in Miami.

He seemed angered that Los Angeles decided to trade him for relatively little draft compensation in the offseason, despite recording 62 1/2 sacks in seven NFL seasons.

“I was pretty much shocked [by the news],” Quinn said. “Honestly, you don't realize you're suffocated until you can't breathe no more. I'm glad that I have a fresh start here in Miami.”

Adam H. Beasley: 305-376-3565, @AdamHBeasley

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