Miami Dolphins

Report: Dolphins’ Tannehill likely won’t need major surgery

Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill clearly took a step forward under new coach Adam Gase this season before his knee injury, ranking a career-best 12th overall in passer rating and eighth in yards per attempt.
Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill clearly took a step forward under new coach Adam Gase this season before his knee injury, ranking a career-best 12th overall in passer rating and eighth in yards per attempt. ctrainor@miamiherald.com

Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill likely will not need a full knee reconstruction, NFL.com reported Monday.

That means he should be able to begin next season on time and be available for training camp as well.

But Tannehill likely will need to wear a brace on his left knee while playing.

NFL.com’s Ian Rapoport, quoting sources, said Tannehill’s rehab is “is going so well that those involved believe he will not need a full reconstruction prior to the 2017 season.”

The Dolphins declined to comment on the report earlier Monday morning.

Tannehill is scheduled to have another MRI today, according to the report. But the knee is strong enough for the Dolphins to feel confident that he won’t need major surgery.

Tannehill has strengthened the knee with rehab exercises and also received treatment from Dr. James Andrews in mid-December, the Miami Herald reported at the time.

He also has played basketball to work on sudden movements, and the knee has responded well to those workouts, according to Rapoport’s report.

Tannehill suffered partial tears in his ACL and MCL when he was hit by Calias Campbell in a Dec. 11 game against Arizona.

Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill speaks with reporters Friday, Jan. 6, 2017, for the first time since getting injured.

Tannehill’s MCL sprain (slight tear) has been more problematic than the ACL injury, according to NFL.com.

MCL sprains (slight tears) generally do not require surgery.

NFL.com said Tannehill may go to Germany “for a knee procedure called Regenokine, a form of platelet-rich plasma therapy made famous by Lakers star Kobe Bryant. Essentially, it takes a patient's blood, spins it to separate the platelets, then is re-injected into the knee.”

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