Miami Heat

Report: Doctors, Miami Heat urging Chris Bosh to sit out rest of season

Chris Bosh has been on blood thinners to treat a blood clot in his calf.
Chris Bosh has been on blood thinners to treat a blood clot in his calf. hgabino@elnuevoherald.com

The ongoing questions surrounding Chris Bosh’s health and future this season are expected to reach a resolution soon, a league source told The Miami Herald.

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Two weeks after he sustained a calf injury that led to him missing the NBA All-Star Game and going back on medication for a similar blood clotting issue he dealt with last year,Yahoo! Sports reported Wednesday afternoon that Bosh was “under increasing pressure from physicians and the organization to sit out the rest of the season because of potential dangers or a recurring medical condition.”

The report said Bosh had a meeting planned with Heat officials, including owner Micky Arison and president Pat Riley in the next 24 hours to move closer to a final determination on his status. The Heat, which declined comment on the reports, is hosting a fundraiser Thursday at AmericanAirlines Arena. Players, including Bosh, are expected to attend.

Last week while his teammates returned to the court to begin the second half of the season without him, Bosh visited doctors in Boston as he continued to be seen by different medical specialists around the country.

A cardiologist at U-Health told The Herald last week that if Bosh began taking blood thinners again for a clot in his calf he would have to be on them for a minimum of three to six months.

Dr. Luis Alvarez of the University of Miami Health System spoke with the Miami Herald in 2015 about blood clots and how they affected Chris Bosh of the Miami Heat after his first blood clot scare.

Yahoo reported that Bosh has been searching for ways to continue playing this season with the use of blood thinners but that scenario has been met with significant resistance.

Bosh, in the meantime, has remained in close contact with his teammates, participating in team meetings, reviewing film with some and even hitting the court, Dwyane Wade said Tuesday, to put up “little jump shots” and break a sweat.

After Wednesday morning’s shootaround, a Heat spokesman said the team had no update on Bosh.

The Heat is down to 10 healthy players on its roster and is barely under the league’s luxury tax threshold. It’s unlikely the Heat will sign another player until after the first week of March so that it can remain under that tax threshold and have more flexibility in the free agent market this summer.

If Bosh retires, he still would be paid what’s left of his five-year, $118 million contract. Per the league’s collective bargaining agreement, though, the Heat would not be able to receive financial relief against the salary cap until the one-year anniversary of Bosh’s last game. He last played Feb. 9 against the Spurs. So, the Heat would carry his $23.7 million salary for next season against its cap and wouldn’t be free of it until the summer of 2017.

Bosh was sidelined last year after the All-Star break for the remainder of the season after blood clots he believed developed in his calf traveled to his lung. He was hospitalized and was on blood thinners before being cleared for a return to the court.

Bosh started all 53 of the Heat’s games before the All-Star break and was leading the team in scoring (19.1 points per game) and three-pointers made.

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