Miami Heat

Missing All-Star competitions is a bummer for Miami Heat’s Chris Bosh

Miami Heat forward Chris Bosh holds up a jersey for the NBA All-Star Game, presented to him before the start of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, in Miami.
Miami Heat forward Chris Bosh holds up a jersey for the NBA All-Star Game, presented to him before the start of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, in Miami. AP

A bummer.

That’s how Chris Bosh described his late decision to pull out of both Saturday’s Three-Point Shootout and Sunday’s NBA All-Star Game because of a calf strain that had been bothering him for roughly a week.

He had anxiously awaited both events, the Three-Point Shootout because of the novelty of the experience, and the All-Star Game because it would he his first in front of the fans he represented for the first seven seasons of his career.

“I’ve been kind of down a little bit for the past couple of days,” Bosh said.

Still, he deemed the decision necessary, especially after what happened early in 2015, when he had a calf strain, which he still believes might have contributed to the blood clot in his lung that ended his 2015-16 season. And although said he is “pretty optimistic” that this calf strain isn’t related, he intends to see a physician after he returns to Miami on Monday.

“As an athlete, we try to keep going with some things, treating it,” Bosh said Saturday, after spending some time on the court with the rest of the East squad, during a playful practice at the Ricoh Center. “But it just lingered. And I didn’t feel it was wise to continue to push it, especially with this elongated week that we have off. I just wanted to make sure I was taking the necessary precautions and being a good professional.”

Bosh made the call after he met with the media Friday, after consulting with the Heat trainers.

“You kind of think about it, think about it, think about it, and then you talk and have an educated conversation,” he said. “Just being smart.”

He was worried that, even in the Three-Point Shootout, he might “jump the wrong way, and then we make it a bigger problem.”

Dwyane Wade said he was aware that Bosh was in discomfort and considering this course of action, but Wade didn’t reveal it to the media because he didn’t deem it his place.

Concerned?

“I don’t know all the fine details of it,” Wade said. “But there’s concern, because of the area that it’s in, that last year [what] he had to deal with. And the time of year, which is the same as last year. There’s always concern when you don’t see [anything] happen.”

The Heat’s regular season resumes on Friday in Atlanta, and Miami will already be without starting center Hassan Whiteside, suspended one game for a flagrant foul against San Antonio in the final game prior to the All-Star break.

THIS AND THAT

▪ According to league sources, the Heat has had ongoing discussions with the NBA about bringing the All-Star Game back to Miami for the first time since 1990, trying to work around conflicts — such as convention center space — related to the International Boat Show.

Previously, the Heat had not pushed for the event, which often frustrates the host city because of limited ticket allotments and other league-mandated rules. The 2017 All-Star Game is already scheduled for Charlotte, North Carolina.

▪ Among his numerous All-Star activities, Wade hosted a charity bowling tournament to benefit the GameChanger program. And this was a game changer: A couple of fans asked not for his autograph, but for that of his 14-year-old son, Zaire, a rising basketball player himself.

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