Miami Heat

Miami Heat center Hassan Whiteside changing habits on social media

Late Monday night, Heat center Hassan Whiteside responded to an Instagram post that quoted a story from Miami New-Times and included stats supporting the premise that the Heat plays better without Whiteside.
Late Monday night, Heat center Hassan Whiteside responded to an Instagram post that quoted a story from Miami New-Times and included stats supporting the premise that the Heat plays better without Whiteside. AP

Hassan Whiteside still wasn’t active on the court Tuesday, even after working extensively in the morning shootaround, rotating on his sore hip and sinking turnaround jumpers.

His activity on social media?

That rarely ceases, though he vows to alter his approach somewhat.

Late Monday night, Whiteside responded to an Instagram post that quoted a story from Miami New-Times and included statistics supporting the premise that the Heat plays better without the 26-year-old center. Whiteside’s reply post included a question of why anyone would post “dumb [expletive] like this,” adding that the Heat changed the offense and got its point guards back while he was hurt.

Tuesday, Whiteside said that he gets upset when “people tell half of the story. I know y’all have been big on my defensive rating when I’m on the court. You know, it was a lot better in January. You know, and just when people tell half the story. Tell the truth. If you’re gonna tell the story, tell it right.”

The Heat’s defensive rating, which had been better with Whiteside in November and December, did flip in January, as noted in a ESPN.com piece that Whiteside quickly retweeted when he spotted it Monday night.

Does Whiteside ever regret battling his critics?

“I just got to do a better job of just leaving that alone,” he said. “I’m always going to be criticized. Nobody’s not criticized. Jesus was criticized. You know, and nobody’s above that. There’s always going to be people saying negative things towards you.”

People still say negative things about Dwyane Wade, even after 12 All-Star selections and three championships. Monday night, after he’d been named the NBA’s East Player of the Week, Wade quoted a tweet that told him to “produce on the court” and “stop playing subpar,” and attached his own comment: “Thanks for the advice. I’ll get right on it.”

“Obviously, there’s a lot of messages on Twitter, all not negative, all not positive,” Wade said. “So you decide which ones you want to kind of talk about. It’s depending on how you’re feeling, really. So when somebody uses something that maybe triggers something in me, I try to use a witty approach. And sometimes it’s witty like ‘ha ha,’ and sometimes it’s witty to get a little poke in. But whatever it is, just like last year, when they said something about LeBron [James] carrying us, I said, ‘I haven’t been carried since my Mama gave birth.”

His motto is “you just can’t be too sensitive about it. You’ve got to be able to laugh about it. Like, I don’t take myself too serious. I think people who get kind of riled up, they take themselves a little too serious. You’ve got to be in on the joke.”

Can Whiteside try to be in on the joke?

“You know, I do it sometimes,” Whiteside said. “But it’s frustrating sometimes. Because I take pride in defense. And for somebody to say that I’m making the team worse with my defense, it don’t make sense to me. That’s kind of why I had to say something. A lot of people don’t tell the whole story.”

TOUGH TYLER

Erik Spoelstra didn’t elaborate on the recovery timetable for Tyler Johnson, though it’s expected to be roughly two months following shoulder surgery. He did explain, however, why Johnson had the surgery now.

“He took it as far as a human being could possibly take it,” the coach said. “We tried everything but surgery.”

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