Miami Heat

Miami Heat says guard Gerald Green doing better but offers few details

Video: Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers discusses Gerald Green situation

Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers speaks with the media on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 about his experience helping Gerald Green and riding in the ambulance with him.
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Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers speaks with the media on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 about his experience helping Gerald Green and riding in the ambulance with him.

A day after Gerald Green was hospitalized and paramedics and police were dispatched to his Miami apartment to deal with an unconscious, bleeding and “combative patient,” his Miami Heat teammates and coaches weren’t offering up any explanations — just well wishes and relief that the 29-year-old shooting guard is doing better.

Veteran point guard Mario Chalmers, who lives in the same building as Green and accompanied him to the hospital, offered up few answers when asked to explain what happened.

Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers speaks with the media on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 about his experience helping Gerald Green and riding in the ambulance with him.

“You know I just tried to be there for my teammate,” Chalmers said about an hour before the Heat played the Timberwolves at the Target Center. “I live in the building. So, for me, a lot of people in the building know me and know that’s my teammate. I just got a phone call to come help.”

Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers speaks with the media on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 about his experience helping Gerald Green and riding in the ambulance with him.

Sources told the Miami Herald on Wednesday that Miami-Dade Fire and Rescue requested assistance from police because there was a “combative patient” at the address where Green lives. Police assisted but did not write a report, and nobody was arrested at the condominium.

Multiple witnesses at the condo told TMZ that Green “was acting strange in the lobby of the condo … screaming at the top of his lungs.” TMZ reported it was told by several people “that there was a huge commotion and it took several people — including emergency personnel — to restrain Green and get him on a stretcher and into an ambulance.”

What did Chalmers see when he approached Green at the scene? “I didn’t really see him in the state,” Chalmers said. “I was just trying to be there for him and trying to figure out what was going on.”

How scary was it? “It was very concerning just for him — moreso about him than me,” Chalmers said. “I was just trying to be there for him. I didn’t know what was going on.”

Heat coach Erik Spoelstra and other players offered only vague explanations as well. Dwyane Wade said he and teammates still don’t know what happened to Green. Wade said he’s just happy Chalmers was there to accompany Green.

“Obviously our minds are on Gerald right now and the only comment we’ll make other than what we made yesterday is that we’re grateful that he’s safe and healthy right now. Our thoughts are with him and his family,” Spoelstra said.

“That’s the only comment we’ll make about it,” Spolestra reiterated when asked when Green might return to the team.

Wade, Chris Bosh and Udonis Haslem — Miami’s captains — said they reached out to Green either through texts or phone calls.

“I talked to him today and he said he was doing better,” Wade said. “That’s all I can ask for.”

Bosh said the Heat will miss Green’s outside shooting in the coming days, but his health is more important.

“We’ll figure out how to win games,” said Bosh, who had a health scare of his own last season and later praised the team for its emotional support. “We always say we’re a family-first organization, and we proved that by just making sure that guys are OK. I think even [Wednesday] Rio being with him and making sure he was OK was a huge thing.”

It’s still unclear what illness Green, Miami’s top scoring option off the bench, was dealing with when he missed Tuesday’s game against the Hawks and if it was related to Wednesday’s incident.

An eight-minute 911 call the Herald reviewed Thursday morning suggests Green was only passed out. No one mentions him screaming or jumping up and down. In fact, his name is never mentioned in the tape.

The entire conversation is between a woman at the front desk of Green’s condo and a 911 operator.

At first the woman at the desk — who sounded calm throughout the almost-8-minute call — tells the operator there is an unconscious man. “I have a resident that just passed out. He’s bleeding,” she said.

She says security is with Green outside in the valet area.

The 911 operator asks how old he is. The desk clerk says in his 20s. When asked if he’s breathing, she says, “Yes, he’s breathing.”

The operator says paramedics are on the way. Then she tells the desk clerk to have the security person lay Green flat on his back. She stays on the phone the whole time until paramedics get there.

At one point she directs them to put a hand on Green’s forehead and another under his neck and to tilt his head back.

Asked if early reports on Green and the incident were unnerving, Haslem responded: “I’ve been in this league a long time and I don’t overreact about anything until I understand what’s really going on.”

Miami Herald staff writer Chuck Rabin contributed to this report.

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