Miami Heat

Why is this night different for Jewish Heat season-ticket holders?

Heat fans attempt to distract Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James as the Miami Heat host the Cleveland Cavaliers at the AmericanAirlines Arena in Decemeber 2014.
Heat fans attempt to distract Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James as the Miami Heat host the Cleveland Cavaliers at the AmericanAirlines Arena in Decemeber 2014. MIAMI HERALD FILE

Miami Heat fans: Why is this night different from all other nights?

It’s Passover for Jews around the world, and at this point, the most important game of the season for the Heat at 7:30 p.m. Monday against Cleveland and LeBron James, as the home team battles for a playoff spot at AmericanAirlines Arena with only two regular-season games left.

So, while Jewish Heat season-ticket holders ponder how they will respond to the situation (attend the traditional seder dinner and tape the game, attend the seder while holding an iPad under the table, or go to the game and risk starting a family feud), there likely will be more seats than usual available on the secondary market for everyone else.

StubHub had more than 500 tickets available early Monday afternoon, upper-level tickets available for as low as $111.

Ticketmaster had plenty of resale tickets for as low as $112 and as high as $1,667.

South Florida’s Jewish fan base is plentiful at Heat games, and Miami’s owner, Micky Arison is Jewish. But Heat senior director of sports media relations Rob Wilson said he expects “a full house’’ Monday night, including Arison.

“It’s LeBron. It’s Cleveland. We need to win,’’ Wilson said. “Whether that’s off the secondary market or otherwise, I would be very surprised if it’s not full.”

Miami has sold out 333 consecutive games, the 10th longest sellout streak in NBA history.

One Heat “lifer’’ from Miami who asked not to be identified said he chose to attend Monday night’s game — and still make his family happy.

“I’m going to take Tuesday off to spend the second seder with the family,’’ he said, adding that he’ll be at Wednesday night’s finale against the Washington Wizards. “The good thing is there are two seders, so I’ll still get to do both.’’

Those who are Jewish and have season tickets to both the Heat and Miami Marlins might have to choose which seder to attend.

The Marlins host the Braves at 7:10 p.m. Tuesday in their home opener.

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