Miami Marlins

Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton likes the bloop hits, too

Miami Marlins right fielder Giancarlo Stanton waits for a pitch against the Colorado Rockies in the seventh inning of a baseball game Saturday, June 6, 2015, in Denver.
Miami Marlins right fielder Giancarlo Stanton waits for a pitch against the Colorado Rockies in the seventh inning of a baseball game Saturday, June 6, 2015, in Denver. AP

The 484-foot home run Giancarlo Stanton tagged on Friday night was the longest hit so far this season in the majors, according to ESPN Stats and Info.

But as impressive as Stanton’s latest tape-measure blast was to behold — a solo shot in the Marlins’ 6-2 victory over the Rockies at Coors Field — Stanton was just as pleased with his 200-foot bloop single to shallow center later in the game.

“That’s my first one of the year like that,” Stanton said of the single, which fell in front of Rockies center fielder Charlie Blackmon. “It’s good to get those for your average.”

While Stanton’s power numbers are strong, his average is admittedly low.

Stanton’s 18 home runs entering Saturday were tied with Washington’s Bryce Harper for National League supremacy. Stanton also led the league with 47 RBI.

But he was hitting just .235. Stanton welcomes any hit whether they’re long balls or dinks.

“They come in all shapes and sizes,” he said of average-aiding hits.

This much is certain: Stanton loves hitting at Coors, which features a forest-like backdrop that is to Stanton’s liking.

Stanton’s 494-foot home run at Coors in 2012 remains the longest of his career. He owns a career batting average of .362 at Coors and has hit eight homers in the 15 games he has played there.

Stanton has now hit three of the five longest home runs this season in the majors, according to ESPN.

arms in waiting

When they had the choice at this time a year ago, the Marlins went with a hard-throwing high school pitcher (Tyler Kolek) over a more-established college pitcher (Carlos Rodon) in the amateur draft.

Kolek sits in the low minors at Single A Greensboro (North Carolina), performing to so-so results, while Rodon has already ascended to the majors as a member of the White Sox’s starting rotation. Come Monday’s draft, when the Marlins have the 12th overall pick, they are more likely to choose a college pitcher, according to sources with knowledge of the team’s thinking.

“There is some college pitching,” said Stan Meek, the Marlins’ vice president of scouting. “[But] the healthy college pitching might not be as deep as we want.”

Among college pitchers the Marlins could be considering: LHP Tyler Jay (Illinois), RHP Carson Fulmer (Vanderbilt), RHP Jon Harris (Missouri State), RHP Dillon Tate (UC-Santa Barbara), RHP James Kaprielian (UCLA), RHP Kyle Funkhouser (Louisville) and RHP Cody Ponce (Cal Poly Pomona).

“I think one of the safest things in the draft is the college performer, so I think some of those guys will be gone before it gets to us,” Meek said.

COMING UP

▪ Sunday: Marlins RHP Jose Urena (0-2, 7.24 ERA) at Colorado Rockies RHP Kyle Kendrick (2-7, 6.55), 4:10 p.m., Coors Field.

▪ Monday: Marlins LHP Brad Hand (1-1, 4.24) at Toronto Blue Jays RHP Marco Estrada (2-3, 3.77), 7:07p.m., Rogers Centre.

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