Baseball

Former UM baseball coach sues A-Rod in postscript to Biogenesis steroid scandal

Veteran University of Miami coach Lazaro "Lazer" Collazo implicated in a steroid criminal case that rattled Major League Baseball has sued New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez for invading his privacy when he bought a local clinic’s medical records and later turned them over to federal authorities.
Veteran University of Miami coach Lazaro "Lazer" Collazo implicated in a steroid criminal case that rattled Major League Baseball has sued New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez for invading his privacy when he bought a local clinic’s medical records and later turned them over to federal authorities. MIAMI HERALD STAFF

A veteran Miami coach implicated in a steroid criminal case that rattled Major League Baseball has sued New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez for invading his privacy when he bought a local clinic’s medical records and later turned them over to federal authorities.

Lazaro Collazo, a former baseball coach at the University of Miami, filed a lawsuit Friday against Rodriguez, a business partner and a private investigative agency that helped the ballplayer acquire patient records stolen from the Biogenesis of America clinic in Coral Gables. Collazo and Rodriguez were patients of the anti-aging clinic before it shut down in late 2012.

Rodriguez, with the help of partner Jose Gomez and the New York P.I. agency Guidepost Solutions, acquired Collazo’s patient records in two separate purchases — one for $200,000 and the other for $4,000 — to prevent them from being turned over to MLB investigators in 2013.

After Rodriguez was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using banned performance-enhancing drugs bought from Biogenesis, he received immunity from federal prosecutors in Miami and turned over the medical records that his intermediaries had acquired for him.

Collazo’s criminal defense attorney, Frank Quintero, who is also representing him in the civil action, claims in the lawsuit that Rodriguez and the other defendants violated his client’s privacy under state law.

“The Biogenesis documents concerning Collazo’s medical conditions, treatment and progress were protected and confidential under Florida law,” Quintero wrote in the suit, seeking unspecified damages.

Quintero claims that disclosure of Collazo’s patient records by Rodriguez and the others was “atrocious and utterly intolerable in a civilized community.”

In March, Collazo pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges of buying steroids without a valid prescription for his own use from a business partner of Biogenesis clinic owner Anthony Bosch.

Collazo, who had been facing more serious distribution charges that were dismissed, was sentenced to a two-year probationary sentence for the coach’s two purchases of steroids in 2013. He was also fined $2,000 and ordered to serve 150 hours of community service.

Seven other defendants in the Biogenesis case were also convicted, including Bosch, who is serving four years in prison.

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