Golf

Doral Notebook, Day 3: Bill Hass gets mulligan after birth of son

Bill Haas in the bunker at the first hole during the first round of the World Golf Championship-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral in Doral on March 6, 2014.
Bill Haas in the bunker at the first hole during the first round of the World Golf Championship-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral in Doral on March 6, 2014. Miami Herald Staff

How many husbands can get away with this?

A week after his son is born, the husband tells his wife, “Well, honey, I’m off to play some golf.”

That’s exactly what Bill Haas, one of the contenders in the WGC-Cadillac Championship heading into Sunday’s final round, had to do.

Of course, maybe Haas can be forgiven because he makes his living playing golf, and the way he is playing he will be able to bring home lots of presents for new son Harrison, his other son, William, and wife Julie.

Latest arrival Harrison was born on Feb. 27 in Greenville, South Carolina, and Haas explained the decision to play in the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral.

“I talked to my wife about it a bunch,” Haas said. “I felt like the top-50 players in the world are here, and I think it’s fun to stack your game up against them.”

And his game has been stacking up just fine, particularly on Saturday when he tied for the day’s low round with a 7-under-par 65

That left him at 4-under for the tournament and trailing leader J.B. Holmes by seven shots.

“It’s just a hard one to skip, a World Golf event, and my son would want me to play, I think,” Haas rationalized. “That’s what I’m telling myself.”

As for his round Saturday, Haas was more than pleased.

“On this course, you have to hit the one shot they are making you hit, and if you don’t, you can make double [bogey],” he said. “And if you do, you can make birdie. I think you can shoot a high score really quick.”

3-IRON RETURNS

Rory McIlroy’s 3-iron was fished out of the lake on No.8 by a scuba diver Saturday.

The diver came to the surface of the lake triumphantly waving the club above his head. McIlroy had flung the 3-iron into the lake in frustration on Friday after hitting his second shot into the water on the par-5 hole.

Is McIlroy happy his 3-iron was back on dry land? Apparently, it doesn’t matter much.

On Saturday, he did not replace it with any other club in his bag.

“I played with 13 clubs,” he said. “Didn’t need it.”

CHIPPING AWAY

▪ Henrik Stenson joking about how he felt after playing partner Dustin Johnson made his hole-in-one on No. 4: “I was walking down there just devastated it wasn’t me.”

▪ There was one downer about those two holes-in-one by Johnson and tournament leader J.B. Holmes. They came on the wrong par-3. If they had been made on either No. 9 or No. 15, the golfer would have won a new Cadillac. That reward was not offered for No.4.

▪ Lee Westwood is at 3-under for the tournament and is in a tie for eighth. However, he is in first place in World Golf Championships starts with 50.

▪ The toughest hole through three rounds? No. 18, naturally. The par-4 is averaging 4.566. The easiest hole has been the par-5 eighth at 4.4632.

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