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PRO WRESTLING: Looking at both sides, if judging former WWE Head Coach Bill DeMott

WWE NXT head coach/trainer Bill DeMott (center) proudly stands with talented wrestlers/sports entertainers Cesaro, Sami Zayn, Adrian Neville and Bo Dallas at the WWE Performance Center in Orlando. DeMott took to Twitter to announce his resignation from WWE.
WWE NXT head coach/trainer Bill DeMott (center) proudly stands with talented wrestlers/sports entertainers Cesaro, Sami Zayn, Adrian Neville and Bo Dallas at the WWE Performance Center in Orlando. DeMott took to Twitter to announce his resignation from WWE. File Photo By Scott Fishman

On Friday, March 6, Bill DeMott issued the following statement on his Twitter account.

“I deny the recent allegations made about me, however, to avoid any embarrassment or damage to the WWE, I've decided to step down from my role effective immediately.”

DeMott served as the first head coach of the WWE Performance Center in Orlando, leading the NXT coaching staff and wrestlers.

Public allegations of misconduct brought by former talent, who worked for him in WWE’s Deep South Wrestling, Florida Championship Wrestling and NXT, led to his recent Twitter post/resignation.

I’ve interviewed him, listened to him talk in a group setting and spoke with him. He enjoyed being part of WWE. He enjoyed working with a stellar staff of coaches/trainers, and he enjoyed helping talent grow into WWE superstars and divas. He was proud of that, also giving credit to others.

I recall WWE and 2K (video gaming) hosting a media event in September at the WWE Performance Center. After introducing Bo Dallas, Cesaro, Adrian Neville and Sami Zayn to the stage, he interrupted his own speech to set-up an impromptu group photo with that talent. Just like a proud dad.

We live in a very sensitive era. Politically correct the mantra.

We witnessed the public outcry with the recent Bullygate in the NFL. The general public could not believe the revelations (the actions of NFL players within their own community/locker-room). Surprised? What did you expect from them? NFL players are gladiators, warriors, putting their bodies on the line each week for your viewing pleasure. It’s not 9-5, suit-and-tie. They hit people for a living, and football fans enjoy it.

The NFL is not checkers and nor is pro wrestling, but things some did or said 20, 10, five years ago is not acceptable nor tolerated anymore. Though, it takes time to change, and it’s easier to groom younger people through this changing process, than those taught differently years ago.

Talk to the older wrestlers. Read their books. What they did or said -- which was considered normal practice in those days -- would be treated much differently today. Back then, accepted. The general public didn’t know or didn’t care. Not saying it’s right, but that’s just the way it was in those days.

DeMott trained in wrestling via legendary wrestling trainer Johnny Rodz. A former WWWF wrestler, Rodz established a long career as a solid hand, used mainly as enhancement talent. Rodz learned, worked in the ring from the 1960s to the 1980s. That era much different than today. So DeMott, like many wrestlers trained old school in the 1980s and 1990s, received a different perspective of wrestling etiquette, compared to today’s teachings.

I don’t know what DeMott said or didn’t say, did or didn’t do. I wasn’t there, but I do know that under DeMott’s watch, NXT has become successful, not just developing NXT talent into WWE superstars and divas but building NXT into its own brand -- featured on WWE Network.

No one can take that away from DeMott.

If he or anyone did something wrong, then punishment is the outcome, and if he or anyone did something right, then credit is deserved. It can be one, the other or both.

DeMott’s passion for the business is strong. One of the most liked wrestlers in the WCW locker-room, when portraying Hugh Morris, the wrestlers even honored him with a show of respect on camera. Talent canvased the top of the ramp-way to applaud him during one of the WCW television broadcasts.

Still, how many in anonymity have been posting disparaging remarks about him or anyone accused?

Always easier to throw fuel on the fire, kick ‘em when they’re down, without acknowledging/knowing each side. Looking at both sides is harder anyway, because then it eliminates those (in hiding) from vindicating their mean-spirited rant via social meanie and the Interne-gative.

As for DeMott’s accusers, who are named, are they right? Are they wrong?

Well, either way, we can all learn from this situation.

Just as we want NFL players and pro wrestlers to be civil human beings, shouldn’t we be wanting the same for ourselves when we’re posting -- especially anonymously -- via social media and the Internet.

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