University of Miami

Miami Hurricanes WR Phillip Dorsett blazes path at UM’s pro day

Phillip Dorsett ran the 40-yard dash in 4.27 seconds, followed by a blazing 4.25 in front of representatives from all 32 NFL teams at UM Pro Day on Wedesday, April 1, 2015.
Phillip Dorsett ran the 40-yard dash in 4.27 seconds, followed by a blazing 4.25 in front of representatives from all 32 NFL teams at UM Pro Day on Wedesday, April 1, 2015. MIAMI HERALD STAFF

The last time University of Miami wide receiver Phillip Dorsett walked onto Greentree Field, after the NFL Scouting Combine, he was $100,000 richer.

On Wednesday, his superb performance on Greentree likely earned him a whole lot more – if not in megadollars now, then in megadollars later.

The 5-10, 184-pound Dorsett, muscles rippling with every step of his rainbow-colored cleats, had an even more amazing performance at UM Pro Timing Day than he did in Indianapolis. He ran the 40-yard dash in 4.27 seconds, followed by a blazing 4.25 in front of representatives from all 32 NFL teams.

“Fantastic,” was how NFL Network analyst Mike Mayock described Dorsett’s day, all the more impressive because he took the risk of running again after his 4.33 laser-timed 40 in Indianapolis earned him the $100,000 from Adidas for the second-fastest time at the NFL combine.

Note that Dorsett’s time Wednesday was recorded by hand-held stopwatches belonging to scouts, and that UM did not release any numbers.

Mayock said on an NFL Network video that he also was impressed with tackle Ereck Flowers, who left UM after his junior season and “is going to be a first-round draft pick.”

“But [offensive lineman Jon] Feliciano could get drafted,” Mayock continued, “[center] Shane McDermott could get drafted. I thought it was a great day for that whole group of players.

“For me, the star of the day was Phillip Dorsett, a kid who didn’t have to do anything because he performed so well at the combine. What did he do today? Comes out, runs a 4.25… jumps 38 inches, 10-9 broad jump, and then looked fantastic catching the football and getting in and out of breaks. Phillip Dorsett had an outstanding day.”

Dorsett, a graduate of Fort Lauderdale St. Thomas Aquinas High, said he had “nothing to prove,’’ but “it was just me and my competitive spirit, because I know everybody wants to see it.

“…A lot of people told me, ‘Don’t run. Just do position drills.’ But I knew I could do better, so I did everything.”

Dorsett, one of 19 Hurricanes who performed Wednesday, wasn’t the only one who raised his draft stock on a gorgeous, pastel-skied afternoon.

Running back Duke Johnson bettered his 40 time from 4.54 at the NFL combine to 4.47, and linebacker Denzel Perryman improved from 4.78 to 4.67 before sustaining a pulled hamstring during his second 40 attempt Wednesday.

“Just a little hammy pull,’’ a smiling Perryman said as he jogged past reporters. “I’ll be alright.”

Perryman hung out with fellow Coral Gables High grad and former Canes linebacker Jon Vilma and was upbeat and confident despite the physical setback.

Joked Vilma, reporting for NBC Sports: “He just wanted to show everyone he could run a sub-4.7. He’ll be fine. Denzel is in a long line of tremendous linebackers to come out of Miami. We’ve all had great careers and I expect nothing less.”

Johnson said he needed to perform better not only for the large NFL crowd, but for himself.

“I know I train too hard to run what I ran at the combine,’’ he said. “I think my game speed speaks for itself.”

Johnson said his “ability to create mismatches, whether in the slot, outside or out of the backfield on a linebacker’’ is the part of his game that translates best to the NFL.

Johnson and the other high-profile players praised the performance of quarterback Ryan Williams, who tore his ACL last April and threw only one pass his senior season.

“Ryan showed he can throw the ball well,” Johnson said. “He can do timing routes with different receivers. He’s not throwing just to one receiver. He’s throwing to everyone, even guys he never threw to before. He came out and showed he can do it and why he should be given a shot at camp to make a team.”

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