Hurricane

Remains of century-old schooner done in by a hurricane emerge on Outer Banks

First Look at World War II Shipwrecks Off NC Coast

NOAA and its research partners are surveying, for the first time since they sank more than 70 years ago, the remains of two ships that were involved in a convoy battle off North Carolina during World War II.
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NOAA and its research partners are surveying, for the first time since they sank more than 70 years ago, the remains of two ships that were involved in a convoy battle off North Carolina during World War II.

The charred remains of a century-old schooner that wrecked in a 1933 hurricane can be spotted in the sand of a popular Outer Banks island for now. But there’s always a chance nature could cover the remains again.

G.A. Kohler.jpg
Cape Hatteras National Seashore

All crew members were saved when the four-masted G.A Kohler crashed onto the beach on Hatteras Island 86 years ago, according to a post Saturday afternoon on the Facebook page of Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

The post included a color photo of the wreckage in the sand and a black-and-white shot of the schooner from the 1930s after the vessel wrecked.

Described in the post as “one of the last large sailing vessels,” the G.A. Kohler was southbound “when a hurricane passed through causing the ship to crash onto the beach,” Cape Hatteras National Seashore officials said in the post.

The vessel remained on the beach for a decade before it was burned during World War II “for her iron fittings,” according to the post.

The G.A. Kohler is among hundreds of vessels that have wrecked along the N.C. coast, according to Cape Hatteras National Seashore. That’s why the N.C .coast also is known as “the Graveyard of the Atlantic,” officials said in the post.

“With the shifting sands, shipwrecks will be uncovered and recovered over and over again,” according to the post.

The G.A. Kohler “is sometimes visible on the beach at Ramp 27,” south of Salvo and north of Avon, officials said.

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management’s new virtual archeology museum uses 3D models, underwater video and detailed maps to give people the chance to explore ocean shipwrecks off the US coast.



A fishing ship broke apart in the Outer Banks on February 4, spreading debris for more than mile on beaches at Cape Point. Seventy volunteers showed up the next day to pick up parts of the shrimp trawler Big John.

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