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There’s only one good thing about another day of storms

Hottest day records happen twice as often as coldest day ones in U.S.

Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.
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Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.

Another day, another storm.

Sorry, everyone: The rain will continue Monday. And Tuesday. And Wednesday.

But all this cloud cover has a silver living. It’ll be cooler. Relatively cooler, anyway.

“We’re not getting out of the 80s,” said CBS4 meteorologist Jennifer Correa.

According to the National Weather Service, the forecast afternoon high for South Florida on Monday is 84. That’s a cold front compared with the sizzling 90s of last week that frequently felt like 100-plus.

The lower temperature comes courtesy of cloud cover, Correa said.

The rain started early Monday morning. It may take coffee breaks through the day and is expected to be back in full force just around the time you head out for lunch or hit the road to head home. Natch.

The afternoon soaking will start in the Keys and Miami-Dade and make its way across Broward County. The peak of the bad weather is expected to be around 2 p.m.

“We have a wet pattern,” Correa told her morning viewers on CBS4.

Tuesday doesn’t look much sunnier.

Monday’s 80 percent chance of rain drops to 60 percent on Tuesday and Wednesday. But it will also be hotter.

Then on Thursday, most of the rain will be gone.

But ...

Temperatures will be back into the 90s.

Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.

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National Weather Service hazardous outlook

Thunderstorms: Scattered to widespread showers with embedded thunderstorms will move across South Florida through most of the day. The main threats will be lightning and periods of heavy rainfall. The strongest storms may produce strong gusty winds and funnel clouds.

Waterspouts: Isolated waterspouts will be possible with any showers and storms across the local waters of South Florida. Wind: The strongest storms will be capable of producing wind gusts in excess of 45 mph.

Flooding: There is the threat for ponding of water along streets as well as minor flooding of low-lying and poor drainage areas across South Florida.

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