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It’s going to feel like more than 100 degrees this week. Here’s what that means for us

Hottest day records happen twice as often as coldest day ones in U.S.

Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.
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Americans have been twice as likely to experience record-breaking heat than record-setting cold, Associated Press data analysis shows. It counted the times daily hot temperature records were tied or broken compared to daily cold records.

Whether or not you choose to go by the school calendar or sun positioning as to when summer starts, this week’s weather will say summer’s already here.

Sunday’s National Weather Service’s Hazardous Weather Outlook for South Florida included a warning about heat indexes over 100 degrees for much of the Miami-Fort Lauderdale area and “maximum afternoon heat index readings of 100 to 105 degrees will continue over most of South Florida into midweek.”

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So while the official high temperatures are projected to be in the high-80s to low-90s, factor in South Florida’s famously heavy humidity, and afternoons outside will feel as if temperatures are in the 100s.

“It’s June in South Florida,” said meteorologist Robert Molleda. “It’s going to be warm.”

Also reminiscent of summer: Afternoon storms are likely throughout the week.

“As is typical in June there is a strong chance of seeing rain at some point,” Molleda said.

According to the weather service, when the heat index gets in the Extreme Caution 90 to 103-degree range, “heat stroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion are possible with prolonged exposure and /or physical activity.”

In the Danger range of 103 to 124 degrees, “Heat cramps or heat exhaustion are likely and heat stroke possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.”

Things to remember if you’re going to be outside for a long time during the mid-morning to late-afternoon chunks of the day:

Get happy with hydration, especially water or drinks that focus on electrolyte replacement.

Wear clothing that’s loose fitting or made from microfiber polyester to help keep the body temperature down.

Nobody said you had to go outside.

Miami Herald staff writer Carli Teproff contributed to this report.
Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about Panthers (NHL and FIU), Dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors and all manner of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He does not work Indianapolis 500 Race Day.
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