Florida

Two Florida men used a truck to treat city’s sewer like a toilet, cops say

Advantage Rooter, a septic and grease trap service based in West Palm Beach, dumped tons of raw sewage without the county’s permission, West Palm Beach police said. Thomas Fucarile, the owner, (left) and Lavoris Grisby, a driver, (right) were arrested and charged.
Advantage Rooter, a septic and grease trap service based in West Palm Beach, dumped tons of raw sewage without the county’s permission, West Palm Beach police said. Thomas Fucarile, the owner, (left) and Lavoris Grisby, a driver, (right) were arrested and charged. Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office

Two men found themselves behind bars after police say they were illegally dumping human waste into West Palm Beach manholes, with some of it spilling onto the road and sidewalks.

Advantage Rooter, a septic and grease trap service based in West Palm Beach, was dumping tons of raw sewage without the county’s permission, police said.

On Friday, Thomas Fucarile, 68, owner of Advantage Rooter, and Lavoris Grisby, 65, a driver for the company, were arrested and charged with three counts of illegal dumping of human waste.

Police were alerted to the dumping back in July.

On July 30, a caller told police that he saw and recorded a man dumping sewage down a manhole near the Lakeside Commons apartment complex, police said.

When an officer had arrived to the area, the truck was gone.

The morning, the driver was back. The same caller recorded a truck at Vista Lago, a condo across the street, pump out community septic tanks then go to the manhole from the night before.

The truck held 3,500 gallons of sewage and made as many as a dozen trips to and from the condo, police said.

Unlike the first dumping, not all the sewage made it into the sewer this time around.

The sewage spilled out and spread across the sidewalk, street and grass. The waste could be smelled for blocks.

When police went to Advantage Rooter’s headquarters to deliver a cease and desist order to Fucarile and his son Sean, the company’s vice president, Fucarile told them that someone from the county had given them the OK to dump the waste in the sewer.

He also said they had to use the city manhole because a lift station was clogged.

“Would you rather have the sewage overflow into the parking lot?” Fucarile told police.

Police then spoke to a supervisor at Palm Beach County Utilities who said, “ABSOLUTELY NOT!”

The Palm Beach Post reported that the city’s water supply was not harmed and Fucarile’s lawyer said he will fight the charges.

Miami Herald Real Time Reporter Devoun Cetoute covers breaking news, Florida theme parks and general assignment. He attends the University of Florida and grew up in Miami. Theme parks are on his mind in and out of the office.
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