Florida

The exterminator just released its Top 50 Mosquito Cities list. Where does Miami rank?

Fight mosquitoes with these simple tips

Fight mosquitoes inside and outside with a few simple tips. Remember to cover windows with screens, remove standing water, and cover your skin with long sleeves shirt and pants. And don't forget insect repellent.
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Fight mosquitoes inside and outside with a few simple tips. Remember to cover windows with screens, remove standing water, and cover your skin with long sleeves shirt and pants. And don't forget insect repellent.

Hate mosquitoes?

No need to answer that question. They are universally repulsed blood-sucking bugs, and they’re about to get really active come summertime.

But at least you don’t live in Atlanta, which topped pest control company Orkin’s newly released Top 50 Mosquito Cities List.

The study ranked the metro areas where Orkin conducted residential and commercial mosquito treatments from April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019.

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Steamy Miami? We ranked 14, down six spots from last year.

The city nicknamed Hot-Lanta hit the No. 1 spot for the sixth year in a row, so try not to complain too much as you swat the pesky critters away. New York City and Washington, D.C., took the top next two top slots.

Other Florida cities included in the study are Tampa (No. 18), Orlando (No. 22) and West Palm Beach at No. 42.

Eleven new cities and metro areas where the flying, blood-sucking carnivores frequent were added, including Jacksonville, at No. 46.

“Mosquitoes are more than annoying; they can be a major health threat,” said Dr. Mark Beavers, Orkin entomologist. “Mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile virus, encephalitides, dengue, chikungunya and for those who may remember, Zika, threaten the safety of humans and pets.”

The mosquito kills nearly 750,000 people each year. Malaria is the cause for the majority of these deaths, but a Zika outbreak has the Americas scared of this insect. This is how the insect spreads disease to its victims.

Mosquitoes aren’t just a nuisance — their bites can transmit serious diseases like Zika, West Nile virus, encephalitides (an inflammatory condition of the brain) and dengue.

“Dengue is always a concern for us, and we are paying especially close attention to a spike in cases in Cuba and other Caribbean islands,’’ Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez said last week, outlining the county’s mosquito-fighting strategies. “A lot of people travel to and from Cuba and other Caribbean and South American countries where dengue numbers are rising now and we need to stay on top of this disease.’’

Officials added that Miami-Dade is using 186 traps to monitor mosquito populations and applying larvicide weekly in the hottest breeding areas, such as Miami Beach and Wynwood, where the Zika outbreak of 2016 was mostly concentrated.

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