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‘He can’t be real!’ Yuki the Giant Wolfdog taking over the Internet

How did wolves become dogs?

Scientists aren’t entirely sure how wolves evolved into dogs, but new research into the genetic and social behavior of wolf pups may offer some clues.
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Scientists aren’t entirely sure how wolves evolved into dogs, but new research into the genetic and social behavior of wolf pups may offer some clues.

Meet Yuki. He may be the biggest wolfdog you’ve ever seen.

Yuki has been at the Shy Wolf Sanctuary in Naples, Florida, for more than a decade, the organization explains on its website, which duly refers to him as “Yuki The Giant Wolfdog.”

In 2008, his owner left the animal, just 8 months old, at a kill shelter because the man was suffering from health issues and the animal was getting too big to handle. The shelter then contacted Shy Wolf.

That was then, this is now.

Yuki is now, by all appearances, a mammoth animal, dwarfing at least one of his human caretakers.

A sanctuary volunteer, Brittany Allen, has shared numerous Instagram posts posing with the hybrid, illustrating its intimidating size.

One post in particular recently caught the Internet’s attention. In the video shared in January, Yuki looks so immense that some followers accused Allen, who is five-foot-four, of doctoring the photo.

“Wowwww, that’s a whole lotta dog, does he have an IG???” wrote one follower.

“Fake,” complained another.

“He can’t be real!”

“Holy Moly Teen Wolf!”

“It’s just his fat angle guys,” Allen wrote in a follow-up post a month later. “We all have one.”

She told popular lifestyle blog Bored Panda that Yuki is indeed big, but weighs about 120 pounds.

Wolves have returned to Northern California, and state officials are looking for help tracking them. Use these tips to help determine if you saw a wolf, a dog or a coyote.

The popular fellow is more wolf than dog. Allen said DNA testing revealed his background: 87.5 percent gray wolf, 8.6 percent Siberian husky, and 3.9 percent German shepherd.

Unfortunately, the animal is not well, suffering from terminal blood cancer. But you can still sponsor him at the sanctuary and assist him with his medical care and other expenses starting at $12 a year.

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