Florida

The patient’s head wasn’t bleeding just from the crash. A paramedic punched him, too

Kendal Billings
Kendal Billings Orange County Sheriff's Office

A Florida paramedic and emergency medical technician had his licenses suspended by the Florida Department of Health after being charged with aggravated battery.

Kendal Billings is accused of punching a 61-year-old man riding in an ambulance with a head injury.

Billings, 26, got his EMT license in 2013 and his paramedic license in 2016. The Department of Health’s Emergency Suspension Order (ESO) and the Ocala Police Department arrest affidavit say he was part of a Nature Coast EMS team responding to a motorcycle accident on Dec. 8.

After the team got Terrance Dolan into the ambulance, the patient became “very uncooperative, which is common for someone suffering from head trauma,” the arrest report said.

A student riding in the back of the ambulance told police he and Billings tried get Dolan restrained for everyone’s safety. As they tried to do so, Dolan kicked Billings, both the student and the ambulance driver told police. The student said Billings responded with five to six closed-fist punches.

“While Mr. Billings was striking Patient T.D., Patient T.D. lost consciousness,” the ESO said. “After Mr. Billings struck Patient T.D., the laceration on the back of Patient T.D.’s head, where the bleeding was previously controlled, began to bleed profusely on the ambulance floor.”

When Dolan awoke, the arrest affidavit says he asked why Billings hit him in the face. The ESO said “Mr. Billings informed Patient T.D. that he was involved in an accident. Patient T.D. responded, ‘No, you punched me’ “

Billings told the police “he punched Dolan with a closed fist ‘a couple times’ to subdue him. Billings advised he was aiming for Dolan’s chest but may have actually struck him in the face.”

He denied Dolan was knocked out from the blows.

Billings was fired from Nature Coast EMS and charged with one count of aggravated battery. He was released after posting $5,000 bond.

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Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about Panthers (NHL and FIU), Dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors and all manner of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He does not work Indianapolis 500 Race Day.


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