Florida

Donations pour in after story reported anemic Hurricane Michael charitable giving

Aftermath of Hurricane Michael leaves Panama City residents stunned

Hurricane Michael, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the continental United States, slammed into the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, unleashing a trail of destruction across 200 miles.
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Hurricane Michael, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the continental United States, slammed into the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, unleashing a trail of destruction across 200 miles.

In the days following a Herald/Times report about the lack of donations toward Hurricane Michael recovery, Bryan Taylor, the president of the United Way of Northwest Florida, arrived to the post office to see the charity’s mailbox stuffed with envelopes.

“We’re so grateful for the overwhelming response,” he said.

This local chapter of the United Way manages the funds for the new Bay County Long Term Disaster Recovery Organization, which was highlighted in the Herald/Times report. That group, which is made up primarily of local nonprofit and faith leaders, is just beginning to address the many issues still ahead for recovery in Bay County — home to Panama City and Mexico Beach — where Michael made landfall last October.

In the five days following the story’s publication, Taylor said they received approximately $16,200, a massive uptick. Of that, about $7,100 came in the mail from readers who referenced the story in their letters, all of whom asked that the funds be designated for the Bay County group.

“I’ve been wanting to contribute to Michael recovery and this is a perfect way — having a long-term recovery organization can help a community in so many ways,” one reader wrote.

“I realize this is a drop in the bucket, but I want you to know that this donation is a direct result of the January 27th article in the Tampa Bay Times,” wrote another.

The rest of the donations came online or through United Way’s text-to-give option. A single donor in Miami gave $5,000. Most, if not all, of those gifts will also be dedicated to the Bay County group, depending on what instructions the donors gave in the online portal.

The Bay County Long Term Disaster Recovery Organization will use this money to help families in some of the hardest-hit areas to fix their homes and clear debris, Taylor said.

“I want to send our most sincere thanks to those who not only read [the] story but responded in such a generous way,” he said.

Clint Moore, 56, came home from evacuating Hurricane Michael to find the storm had taken his home and his family-owned shrimping business in Simmons Bayou, Florida. Now Moore looks to rebuild.



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