Florida Politics

With recounts coming, did your vote count? Here’s how to keep track of it

How does an election recount work?

Florida law requires an automatic recount in a race in which the difference in vote totals is half a percent or less. The law requires a manual recount if the difference in the vote totals is 1/4 of a percent or less.
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Florida law requires an automatic recount in a race in which the difference in vote totals is half a percent or less. The law requires a manual recount if the difference in the vote totals is 1/4 of a percent or less.

You’re sure you marked your ballot for either Sen. Bill Nelson or Gov. Rick Scott in the U.S. Senate race. Ditto, you picked either Ron DeSantis or Andrew Gillum for governor in Tuesday’s midterm elections. You also voted for a commissioner of agriculture.

But now a statewide recount looms in the Scott-Nelson Senate race because Scott’s lead is margin-thin. Also facing a recount is the agriculture race between Matt Caldwell and Nicole “Nikki” Fried because they are within the machine recount window of half of 1 percent, according to incomplete and unofficial statewide returns.

DeSantis’ victory over Gillum in the gubernatorial race is also narrowing, though slightly outside that threshold.

Suddenly the gnawing fear among voters is this: I cast my ballot by mail, or I had to fill out a provisional ballot since I went to the wrong polling place or forgot my ID. How do I make sure my vote was — or will be — counted if there’s a recount?

First, track the status of your ballot if you voted absentee (meaning, by mail). If you’re registered to vote in Miami-Dade you can check by visiting the election site online by clicking here. If you’re registered in Broward County click here. If you’re registered in Palm Beach County click here.

You will be asked to fill in your name and birth date.

You can also check your voting status on the Florida Department of State’s website.

If there was a problem with your mail-in ballot, such as a missing signature or one that doesn’t match records, you would have already received notice before Tuesday and given the opportunity to submit something called a cure affidavit (basically a form to fix the issue) with your signature and a copy of proper identification, according to Suzy Trutie, deputy supervisor at Miami-Dade Elections.

If you were given a provisional ballot, you already were given a receipt with instructions on what you can do to check whether it has been accepted and counted. Supervisors in Florida’s 67 counties have until noon Saturday to submit results of the provisional ballots — pass or fail.

You have until 5 p.m. Thursday to present written evidence to the supervisor of elections in your county to support your eligibility to vote.

Here is where to go:

Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections, 2700 NW 87th Ave., Doral. Call 305-499-8683 or email soedade@miamidade.gov.

Broward Supervisor of Elections, 115 S. Andrews Ave. Room 102, Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-357-7050 or email Elections@browardsoe.org.

Palm Beach Supervisor of Elections: 240 S. Military Trail, West Palm Beach. Call 561-656-6200 or email susanbucher@pbcelections.org.

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A copy of a letter you can fill out to try and prove your eligibility to have your provisional ballot counted. Courtesy Latina Comunica

If you voted in the traditional manner in person at a polling place during the two-week early voting period or at your precinct Tuesday on Election Day and all went smoothly — in other words, your filled-in ballot was deposited and accepted by the ballot reader at the precinct, you’re done.

The only downside is you can’t check on the status of your ballot.

Follow @HowardCohen on Twitter.
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