Floridians will now vote on 12 rather than 13 amendments after the state Supreme Court ruled Friday to keep three amendments on the ballot but strike down a fourth. All four had been placed on the ballot by the Constitution Revision Commission, which meets once every 20 years.
Floridians will now vote on 12 rather than 13 amendments after the state Supreme Court ruled Friday to keep three amendments on the ballot but strike down a fourth. All four had been placed on the ballot by the Constitution Revision Commission, which meets once every 20 years. Pedro Portal pportal@miamiherald.com
Floridians will now vote on 12 rather than 13 amendments after the state Supreme Court ruled Friday to keep three amendments on the ballot but strike down a fourth. All four had been placed on the ballot by the Constitution Revision Commission, which meets once every 20 years. Pedro Portal pportal@miamiherald.com

Florida Supreme Court rules three amendments will stay on ballot

September 07, 2018 03:54 PM