State Politics

Ambassador Trujillo? Miami legislator being recruited for Trump job

State Rep. Carlos Trujillo presents Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump with a classic linen Cuban Guayabera after a townhall-style meeting at the Miami Dade College Koubek Center on Tuesday, September 27, 2016
State Rep. Carlos Trujillo presents Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump with a classic linen Cuban Guayabera after a townhall-style meeting at the Miami Dade College Koubek Center on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 EL NUEVO HERALD

State Rep. Carlos Trujillo, an early and reliable Hispanic surrogate for president-elect Donald Trump, is being rewarded for his loyalty by being recruited to serve as the new administration’s ambassador to a major Latin American country somewhere in the Southern Hemisphere.

Trujillo, 33, the son of Cuban immigrants, became a Trump supporter early in the campaign, when few Miami Republicans were willing to embrace Trump because of his caustic comments about Mexicans and immigration. But Trujillo, a lawyer who has emerged as an articulate advocate for conservative principles in Tallahassee, stayed with him as a prominent local fundraiser and national Hispanic spokesman.

He told the Herald/Times Wednesday he was being considered to serve as ambassador to South American or Central American countries “that are important to Florida,” but the details are still being negotiated. He is fluent in Spanish.

“It’s a great opportunity to serve your country,” Trujillo told the Herald/Times. “It’s humbling. But it has to be the right country and the right time.”

Trujillo, who is a member of House Speaker Richard Corcoran’s inner circle, was recently named to the powerful post of House Appropriations Committee chairman. He expects an announcement from the Trump administration in early February and, if it happens, he said he will remain in office long enough to serve through the 2017 legislative session because of the lengthy vetting and Senate confirmation process.

“Carlos Trujillo was one of the top Hispanic surrogates in the country for the Trump campaign. He was somebody who risked a lot — because he was in a very swing district,” said Rep. Jose Felix Diaz, R-Miami, a close friend of Trujillo’s and another member of the Corcoran inner circle.

“It would be a real shame for the Dade delegation to lose Carlos Trujillo but it would be a great opportunity for our state to have an up-and-coming leader to represent us,” Diaz said. “He would be impactful for decades to come. I’d hate to see him leave but I’d also hate to see him stay and forgo a good opportunity for him and his family.”

Trujillo was born on Long Island, New York, and moved to Florida just short of his fifth birthday in 1988. He attended Spring Hill College in Mobile, Alabama, where he majored in international business and was the vice president of the Student Government Association. He received his law degree from Florida State University College of Law in 2007 and served as an assistant state attorney for the 11th Judicial Circuit Court of Florida. He started his own law firm, Trujillo Vargas Ortiz Gonzalez LLP, based in Miami.

Trujillo is married to Carmen Maria Mir and they have four children: Carlos Manuel, Isabella Alba, Juan Pablo, and Felipe Andres.

Following the night of the first 2016 presidential debate, Donald Trump visited Miami Dade College to hear testimonials from South Florida Hispanics, who shared life experiences and their admiration for Trump. He was given a linen Cuban guayabera

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