Elections

The final results are in for Miami-Dade. And here are the numbers

From left, Miami-Dade County Elections Department members County Judges Tanya Brinkley and Victoria Ferrer with Christina White, Miami-Dade County Elections Supervisor, review ballots as part of the recount process in Doral on Saturday November 17, 2018
From left, Miami-Dade County Elections Department members County Judges Tanya Brinkley and Victoria Ferrer with Christina White, Miami-Dade County Elections Supervisor, review ballots as part of the recount process in Doral on Saturday November 17, 2018 pportal@miamiherald.com

After tabulating 248 overseas ballots and six more mail ballots, Miami-Dade elections submitted its final results to the Department of State late Saturday night.

Read Next

In total, 801,547 votes were cast in Miami-Dade in the race for U.S. senator. Bill Nelson won received the majority of those votes, pulling in 485,496 votes. Rick Scott received 316,020.

Miami-Dade County Election Supervisor Christina White has been praised for her handling of the challenging recount. White oversees the largest elections operation in Florida and seventh-largest in the nation.

Nikki Fried came out on top in the race for commissioner of agriculture, with 475,943 of a total of 781,139 votes. Matt Caldwell received 305,196 votes.

Between the recount, newly accepted mail ballots, and tabulation of overseas ballots, Fried widened the margin between her and Caldwell by 187 votes. The final tally on Saturday put Fried 170,747 votes ahead of Caldwell.

IMG_105RecountElect11NEW_3_1_C3EQG1N9_L431298741.JPG
Miami-Dade County Election department staff members work on ballots for the manual recount over/under votes for commissioner of agriculture in Doral on Saturday November 17, 2018 Pedro Portal pportal@miamiherald.com

The six mail ballots counted Saturday night had previously been rejected due to issues with the signatures, but were accepted after the voters submitted cure affidavits by the extended deadline at 5 p.m.. In total, 40 cure affidavits were submitted. However, 34 were rejected for failing to meet the requirements.

The most common reason for rejection was failure to use the updated cure affidavit, which states clearly that the voter had not received notification of a problem with their ballot before the Nov. 5 deadline to fix it. Twenty-seven ballots were rejected because the voter failed to affirm that they had not received information about problems with their ballot deadline prior to Nov. 5.

An affirmation that the voter had not received the information prior to Nov. 5 was added to an updated version of the cure affidavit posted online Friday. The language was based on the circuit court ruling Friday stating the deadline was extended only for voters who did not have the opportunity to provide a cure affidavit by the original deadline because they had not received notification of a problem.

At least 31 voters sent in the old version of the cure affidavit that did not have the updated verbiage. If there was no other way for the elections department to be sure the voter had not received information prior to Nov. 5, the ballot was rejected. Four of those were accepted by the canvassing board on Saturday night, the rest thrown out.

  Comments