Politics

Live Election Day blog: Polls close, Crist campaign calls for extended voting hours

A voter rides his bicycle up to his voting precinct at Agenoria S. Paschal / Olinda Elementary School in Brownsville on election day, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014.
A voter rides his bicycle up to his voting precinct at Agenoria S. Paschal / Olinda Elementary School in Brownsville on election day, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Miami Herald

Follow our coverage of Crist's request to extend voting hours here.

Polls in Florida closed at 7 p.m., but the Charlie Crist campaign is pushing to keep precincts open in Broward County, which reported a few glitches Tuesday afternoon.

Crist’s campaign sent out a press release shortly before 7 p.m. announcing it had filed an emergency injunction to extend voting hours until 9 p.m. The campaign argued that extra time was needed to make up for “individual and systemic breakdowns,” including a polling station that went offline for more than 90 minutes and EVID voting machines.

“We have reports in many cases that voters who were confused about their proper polling location were provided conflicting information and, in many cases, simply gave up attempting to cast a regular ballot,” the campaign stated.

The Crist campaign says a similar request was made to the Broward County Supervisor of Elections, who denied it. But Supervisor Brenda Snipes said she was unaware of any such request.

One official with the supervisor’s office told The Herald that all precincts have been closed. Maybe six to 10 still have lines of about a half hour, he said.

Broward’s canvassing board is proceeding normally.

-- AMY SHERMAN and DAVID SMILEY

6 P.M., WEST KENDALL REGIONAL LIBRARY

Miami Rep. Joe Garcia spent part of Election Day afternoon giving directions to would-be voters who were confused about where to vote.

They showed up at the West Kendall Regional Library, one of the county's largest precincts in the 2012 presidential election. Earlier this year, the Miami-Dade elections department redrew some precincts -- including those at the West Kendall library -- to make them smaller. The department says it notified those voters.

But many of them either didn't receive a notification or didn't pay attention, because they kept getting turned away Tuesday by poll workers who printed out slips of paper listing their new, nearby polling places.

-- PATRICIA MAZZEI

5:50 P.M., PALMETTO EXPRESSWAY

If jumping on the Palmetto Expressway and heading past Okeechobee Road was part of your post-work voting plans, there’s bad news.

Already a rush hour nightmare on the average weekday afternoon, officials have closed the highway’s north and south lanes due to a severe crash, according to Channel 7. The station’s cameras captured a rescue helicopter landing on the highway at 5:30.

Look elsewhere for your route to the polls.

(UPDATE: Miami-Dade Fire Rescue says the expressway lanes have reopened.)

-- DAVID SMILEY

5:30 P.M., BAL HARBOUR

Bal Harbour candidate Jordan Cohn, 79, who is running for the Village Council District 1 seat, collapsed near the village’s polling place at around 3:30 p.m.

Witnesses say he was outside on the sidewalk with a campaign sign when he collapsed.

“People were helping him keep comfortable before Fire Rescue arrived,” resident Brian Mulheren said in a phone interview. “It was sunny and a bit hot outside.”

Police Chief Mark Overton said he was transported to the hospital but didn’t have an update on Cohn’s health status.

“Rescue came and attended,” he said in a phone interview. “He was later transported to the hospital.”

Cohn is running for office against Seth Salver.

-- RODOLFO ROMAN

5 P.M., BROWARD COUNTY

In an election expected to draw just under 50 percent of voters around the state, Broward County -- where Democrats outnumber Republicans more than two-to-one -- appears to be headed for a woeful turnout.

As of 3:15 p.m., 136,000 voters had cast ballots, according to the supervisor of elections. Another 248,000 voted early or by absentee ballot.

There are 1,072,349 registered voters in Broward -- equal to a mid-afternoon turnout of about 36 percent.

Polls close in two hours

-- AMY SHERMAN and DAVID SMILEY

4:30 P.M., WEST KENDALL

Republican congressional candidate Carlos Curbelo is pushing through the last few hours of voting outside John A. Ferguson Senior High School, where he’s glad-handing voters and taking pictures with supporters. It’s Curbelo’s territory -- he’s a sitting Miami-Dade School Board member -- and voters in the late afternoon are making him comfortable.

-- PATRICIA MAZZEI

3:42 P.M., NORTH MIAMI

A few voters like Carmelo Infante, a Democrat, said they were actually swayed to vote for Charlie Crist by the political ads that dominated the airwaves.

"I really liked his commercial with [President] Obama," Infante, 23, said.

Evans Henry, a North Miami resident, said that although he's a registered Republican he couldn't support Gov. Scott.

"I'm a common sense voter, Scott is not good for the state," Henry said.

— LANCE DIXON

3:28 P.M., FRED LIPPMAN MULTI-PURPOSE CENTER IN HOLLYWOOD

Yvette Pino, of Hollywood, chose Charlie Crist for governor — but the registered Democrat said her vote was primarily a vote "against Rick Scott."

Pino, 55, said she was bothered by Scott's track record of Medicare fraud, and she objected to the governor's education policies.

Pino is a school counselor at Hialeah Gardens High School, and she said Florida's overemphasis on standardized tests is unfair and is stressing out students.

"They worry, they break down in tears," she said. "I've seen them break down in tears."

Pino said she also objected to Scott's education cuts that happened early in his term as governor.

Pino doesn't have children in Broward schools, but she still supported Broward's $800 million school bond issue. Pino said the district's past corruption scandals did cross her mind.

"I did think about it, but you know anything that has to do with helping the kids ... I had to go for it," Pino said.

— MICHAEL VASQUEZ

2:50 P.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

On Election Day, hours seem like decades for candidates and campaign operatives. They can't resist obsessing about what they might have done differently, or better.

Steve Bousquet of the Tampa Bay Times writes about the agonizing wait for results here.

2:15 P.M., GREENGLADE ELEMENTARY IN WEST DADE

Guess who’s out campaigning today?

Former congressman David Rivera, clad in his congressional polo shirt, was handing out slate cards with his recommendations at Greenglade Elementary. He was also distributing petition forms — apparently for a 2016 House run.

He wouldn’t give the Herald a card, but we got one anyway.

— PATRICIA MAZZEI

1:27 P.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

The race for governor has been a close one according to several polls, and going into Tuesday, it remains very tight. Here is Miami Herald political writer Marc Caputo’s analysis of polling data going into Election Day.

— JOEY FLECHAS

1:15 P.M., CORAL GABLES

So remember that poll watcher wearing a Daniel Diaz Leyva shirt that angered a voter earlier?

Turns out the angry voter was right. That is against the rules.

We checked with the Miami-Dade Elections Department, and they said poll workers and poll watchers cannot wear campaign attire inside polling room.

Here is Miami Herald writer Patricia Mazzei tweeting about the incident.

— PATRICIA MAZZEI AND CARLI TEPROFF

12:56 P.M., MIAMI-DADE ELECTIONS DEPARTMENT

The canvassing board , which includes two county judges, Andrew Hague and Shelley Kravitz, and the supervisor of elections Penelope Townsley, convened at noon to tackle the latest batch of absentee ballots. The batch included 12,479 ballots, 10,797 of which were valid.

There were 1,682 ballots that were invalid and needed to be reviewed. Most of those ballots, 1,385, did not have signatures.

The board told staff to check "one more time" before stamping them invalid.

Meanwhile, the board reviewed ballots where the signatures didn't match or there wasn't a signature, but a name was printed.

"I could do that," said Kravitz before stamping it. The next ballot was rejected.

The board will continue until all of the ballots have been reviewed.

— CARLI TEPROFF

12:30 P.M., COOPER CITY

Joan Paul, a 70-year-old retired teacher and registered Democrat, said she was at the Cooper City Library late Tuesday morning when she saw between 15-20 voters, Democrats and Republicans, arrive only to find the library was only an early voting location.

Paul had planned on volunteering herself before learning, upon arrival, that the longtime voting precinct had changed.

This kind of issue has come up in both Broward and Miami-Dade counties today. In Miami-Dade, about 6 percent of voters had their boundaries redrawn this year.

Broward completely reorganized its precincts late last year, and notifications were mailed out in January 2014 to voters who were affected and those who were not.

Still, Paul said the Supervisor of Elections should have highlighted the changes closer to Election Day.

“Something is wrong with this picture,” she said. “Something is very wrong.”

She’s helping with the Crist campaign, but she said he felt bad for anyone who has trouble voting.

“Today we’re all the same,” she said. “We just want to get people out to vote.”

Officials in both counties are urging voters to double check their precincts before heading out to vote. Voters can check here for Miami-Dade and here for Broward.

— JOEY FLECHAS

12:19 P.M., MIAMI BEACH

At the Indian Creek fire station, Carlos Acosta, A 58-year-old massage therapist, said he voted to allow libraries to be built in parks.

"I think it would be very helpful in bringing information to people," he said.

— CHRISTINA VEIGA

12:09 P.M., MIAMI BEACH

Gilson Schnaider voted late Tuesday morning at the Indian Creek fire station with his young son in tow.

The 50-year old voted for Crist because he was concerned about how much money Scott has poured into his campaign.

"To invest so much money to be governor, for the pleasure of being governor, you know he has ulterior motives," Schnaider said.

The negative ads that were a staple this campaign season seem to have impacted Schnaider. He said he also voted against Scott because of his affiliation with Health Corporation of America.

"His past is dirty, in my opinion," Schnaider said.

As for medical marijuana, the North Beach resident said he voted in favor. Originally from Brazil, he cited a case that allowed a young girl there access to the drug, improving her medical condition.

"There is nothing more natural," Schnaider said.

— CHRISTINA VEIGA

12:04 P.M., BROWARD COUNTY

The Broward County Commission approved a plan by Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes in December 2013 to reorganize precincts. The plan reduced the number of precincts by about 200 to 577 precincts in Broward ranging in size between 217 to 6,660 voters.

In January 2014, Snipes sent all voters -- whether their precinct location changed or not -- a new voter information card. That was about 10 months before the general election, so it’s likely that many voters weren’t paying close attention at that point.

— AMY SHERMAN

NOON, CALEB CENTER IN MIAMI

Some voters seemed frustrated after parking and trying to vote at the Model City library at Caleb Center, located in the 2200 block of NW 54th Street.

"It is an early voting site only," wrote Chief Deputy Supervisor of Elections Christina White, in an email to the Miami Herald.

Caleb Center was very busy last Sunday when hundreds of churchgoers packed the facility during a Souls to the Polls rally with rev. Al Sharpton.

"Most everybody now knows where to cast their votes," said Tangie Hence, who is campaigning for Judge Jacqueline Schwartz near a polling place at Charles Hadley park, in the 1300 block of 50th Street. "They know what time it is."

— THEO KARANTSALIS

11:51 A.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

Here’s some insight on Florida elections and voting: a look back at some of our top fact-checks that relate to Florida’s botched attempt to purge noncitizens from the rolls, restoring voting rights for felons, the state’s early voting law and other claims related to elections.

— AMY SHERMAN

11:35 A.M., WEST KENDALL REGIONAL LIBRARY

Muriel Elkind hobbled from her car, leaning on her walker. Her husband, Herman, walked beside her. They were ready to vote for the Democratic and independent candidates.

But when they got to the library, they were told the polling place they'd visited for the last 12 years had changed to another library down the road.

So the Elkinds began their slow trek back to the car.

"It's not that it's that far away," said Muriel Elkind, an 86-year-old Democrat, of her new polling place, the Kendale Lakes Branch Library. "It's that they didn't tell us."

In a tweet, the Miami-Dade County Elections office said some voters in West Kendall were affected "by a small reprecincting that went into effect in June 2014." The office added that they sent impacted voters a mailer with their new site's address, picture and Google map illustrating the site location.

Still, the Elkinds weren't happy with the change.

"If we wanted to, we could've said 'To Hell with it,'" Herman Elkind, 89, said. Herman has no party affiliation.

Despite the hassle, they headed to their new site instead to cast their votes.

"This is a local election," Muriel Elkind said. "This has the most impact."

— KATHRYN VARN

11:20 A.M., DORAL

At Fire Station 69, voters were moving in and out of the polling location with ease, but many who spoke to the Miami Herald were not sure why they were voting.

None of the dozen voters interviewed wanted to give their names, but some forgot candidate’s names, and many said it’s important to vote even if you’re not sure who or what you’re voting for.

"The questions were hard to understand, " an FIU student said. "So I put whatever. Voting is voting"

— MONIQUE MADAN

11:15 A.M., CORAL GABLES

An optical ballot-scanning machine had jammed at least twice Tuesday morning — though not consecutively — at the American Legion Post 98 polling place in Coral Gables, a poll worker said. The ballots counted but the worker had to open the machine and manually dislodge the sheets of paper so the next person could vote.

The small polling place was bustling. Only 167 people had voted as of about 11 a.m.

One voter complained that a young man sitting in a corner of the polling place wore a polo shirt for Daniel Diaz-Leyva, a Republican running for a swing Florida House seat against Democratic state Rep. José Javier Rodríguez. The voter was told that the young man was a poll watcher for the campaign. The poll watcher was allowed to stay.

Poll workers and poll watchers cannot wear campaign attire inside polling room, said Deputy Supervisor of Elections Carolina Lopez.

— PATRICIA MAZZEI and CARLI TEPROFF

10:51 A.M., NORTH DADE REGIONAL LIBRARY IN MIAMI GARDENS

There was some confusion Tuesday at the North Dade Regional Library in Miami Gardens as some voters walked in and out very quickly. The reason? They were attempting to vote outside of their precinct.

The library, at 2455 NW 183rd St., served as one of two early voting locations in the city and was one of the most active sites during early voting. Volunteers and residents said that mix-up seemed to be the most prevalent reason voters were turned away and told to go to the appropriate polling place.

Melvenia Myles, a Democrat who has lived in Miami Gardens for about 11 years, said she supported her party across the ballot.

"I want to get all those Republicans out of there," Myles said.

— LANCE DIXON

10:41 A.M., MIAMI-DADE ELECTIONS DEPARTMENT

Most of the precinct changes in Miami-Dade County happened before the primary election in August. Christina White, the chief deputy supervisor of elections, said about six percent of voters were affected and each voter was sent a new voter's registration card and a letter.

Redistricting helped to break up some of the larger precincts, she said.

White said voters still need to double check their precinct before showing up at the polls.

Only 15 polling places were changed between the primary elections and general elections because of reasons including construction or the place wasn't available. Those voters were notified and a notice is placed at the polling place.

With early voting and absentee ballots, Dade County is at about 23 percent voter turn-out. Total average turn-out for the race for governor, White said, is about 40 percent.

— CARLI TEPROFF

10:25 A.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

Obama cut a last-minute radio ad for Charlie Crist this week.

Read more here.

— PATRICIA MAZZEI

10:15 A.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

As polls opened Tuesday morning, 3.1 million people already voted. Democrats cut GOP early ballot lead to 98,000, or 3.3%

Read more here.

— MARC CAPUTO

10:10 A.M., PALM AIRE IN POMPANO BEACH

Al Gutierrez, a 43-year-old banker and registered GOP voter, chose Scott.

"At least he kept one party the last five years,” he said. He also voted in favor of medical marijuana.

Elsa Palacio, originally from Colombia, opposed medical marijuana.

"It's an addiction," said the 59-year-old GOP voter and housewife. "I don't think it's medicine."

Sandra Balzo, a 60-year-old Democrat and mystery writer, voted for Crist.

She opposes Scott because he is against same-sex marriage.

"I think we should be supporting people loving each other — not legislating against it," said the mom of an adult gay son. "The whole idea of marriage is to create a support system for families. I don't think it matters if they are same sex or not."

— AMY SHERMAN

10:05 A.M., WESTON BRANCH LIBRARY

Cristina de la Rosa, 49 and not registered with a party, said she hesitantly voted for Scott.

"Frankly, I don’t like either of them,” she said. “I voted for the lesser of two evils.”

On medical marijuana, de la Rosa said Florida needs to "give it a little more time."

"It's not because I'm 100 percent against it, I don't want it in Florida just yet. I want to see how it works in other states," de la Rosa said.

De la Rosa has school aged children, and supported the bond for Broward schools.

"It's a no brainer that they need more funding."

— MELHOR LEONOR

10 A.M., PALM AIRE IN POMPANO BEACH

Andres henriquez, 67, a Cuban independent, said he voted for Amendment 2, or legalizing medical marijuana.

"It is necessary for people that have certain illnesses like cancer or aids," he said.

He also voted for Charlie Crist.

"He is pro-gay marriage and pro-many things, even though when he was governor previously he was against all this stuff ."

The issue of same-sex marriage is a personal one for Henriquez, who gay. When his partner of 36 years died, he could not bury him and had to have a relative of his partner sign burial papers.

— AMY SHERMAN

9:56 A.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

Florida’s gotten a lot of attention on Facebook this campaign season, according to data from the social media website.

A list of the top 10 talked-about candidates on Facebook list Rick Scott as number one and Charle Crist in eighth place.

Some of this traffic likely stems from “#fangate,” or the the awkward moment at the beginning of the second gubernatorial debate where Rick Scott did not immediately come onstage as a fan blew under Charlie Crist’s lectern — an alleged violation of the debate rules.

— JOEY FLECHAS

9:45 A.M., WEST DADE

Governors Rick Scott and Rick Perry rallied volunteers Tuesday morning at the West Dade Victory Center, urging them to encourage friends and family to go to the polls.

"We're going to have a big win," Scott told the roughly 50 volunteers and supporters packed into a suite at the center. "They're going to call it early because we're going to win because of you."

Scott and Perry shook hands, hugged and took photos with the group before leaving for their next stop in Ft. Myers.

— KATHRYN VARN

9:30 A.M., SOUTH MIAMI-DADE

For Derek Boyd, 26, a fourth grade teacher and a registered Democrat, coming to vote was important.

"Rick Scott was already in there and cut education," said Boyd, a Cutler Bay resident, who has been teaching for about two years. "I usually vote Democrat now."

The FIU student opposed his school’s expansion, fearing his tuition would go up in the future. When it came to the legalization of medical marijuana, he was in favor.

— MATIAS OCNER

9:21 A.M., WESTON BRANCH LIBRARY

Joe Sloboda, 45, Republican who has voted in the last few elections, picked Rick Scott to be Florida’s next governor.

“I don't like the indecisiveness of Crist,” he said. “Scott supported job creation. Scott stands with small businesses, and I'm a small business owner.”

He supports Amendment 2, and he also voted for Republican Joe Kaufman, challenger to incumbent Democrat Debbie Wasserman-Schultz in the race for 23rd U.S. Congressional District.

“I really didn't like that Wassermann-Schultz protested Hobby Lobby,” he said. “I don't think a member of congress should be protesting the policies of a small business, specially one that pays above the minimum wage. Also, if her party says the sky is red, she says yes. I'm flexible, she's not.”

— MELHOR LEONOR

9:20 A.M., DORAL

The polling place is quiet. Sun shining in and out amid sporadic winds, blowing campaign cards in the lot.

Volunteers chase after them, and they swarm voters as they park and walk toward the door of the polling place.

Nadia Rengifo, 34, got an early start to go vote — so early, in fact, that she came in her pajamas.

The Democrat voted for Charlie Crist, citing her displeasure with Scott.

But in the municipal elections, she voted for the Republican candidate, Peter Cabrera, for City Council.

"I voted Pete. Democrat or Republican, you still have to do your research and see who will serve your community more, despite political party," she said.

And why did she vote at all?

"If you vote, you have the right to complain afterward," she said. " You can't not vote and then complain about the outcome."

— MONIQUE MADAN

9:15 A.M., OPA-LOCKA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Evelyn Morales, a Democrat in a Republican family, cast her vote at 7:30 a.m. The longtime Opa-locka resident said she voted for Charlie Crist for governor and for Rose Tydus as Opa-locka mayor.

“I want a change for the city,” she said speaking in Spanish. “Tydus looks intent on making changes like improving safety, beautifying parks and increasing cleanliness.”

Darline Pierre-Georges, 36, voted before going to work.

The Democrat said she voted for Andre Faustin for Opa-locka City Commission because he is the only new candidate.

"I wanna see what he can bring," she said. "All the others have been there already."

— MARISOL MEDINA

9:14 A.M., CROISSANT PARK ELEMENTARY, BROWARD COUNTY

The Supervisor of Elections office saying the problem at this precint has been fixed.

— AMY SHERMAN

8:55 A.M., CROISSANT PARK ELEMENTARY, BROWARD COUNTY

The power went out at this precinct, but voter continue to be verified by phone with the county’s database, and no voters are being turned away, according to the Supervisor of Elections spokeswoman Mary Cooney.

“The machines are fine,” she wrote in an email. “It is a power issue with the school. School electrician has been sent over.”

— AMY SHERMAN

8:45 A.M., POMPANO BEACH

At the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, GOP voter Carole McKenzie, 80, voted for Scott and against medical marijuana.

As for why Scott got her vote: "I have no complaints with the last four years."

She voted against Amendment 2 because "I didn't like the way it was worded. ... I think they need to regulate it better."

But John Costa, also a Republican voter, said he voted in favor of the medical marijuana amendment.

"I thought it would help the economy," said the 73 year old who is semi-retired and works in real estate. "It did wonders for California."

— AMY SHERMAN

8:39 A.M., MIAMI-DADE ELECTIONS DEPARTMENT

Miami-Dade County's 812 precincts were all up and running by 7 a.m., said elections department spokeswoman Carolina Lopez.

"Every single precinct was up, on time and we have not heard anything to indicate that they are not running smoothly," Lopez said.

Lopez said the department checks in with the precincts regularly to make sure everything is on track.

At the headquarters in Doral, which was used as an early voting site, an electronic sign flashed, telling voters to go to their precincts.

While it is not uncommon for people to show up at the wrong precinct, Lopez encouraged voters to call 311 or visit www.miamidade.gov/elections.

"It doesn't hurt to double check," she said, adding that there was very little change between the primary elections and the general elections.

The three-member canvassing board will begin at noon to review provisional ballots. Lopez said there has been a steady volume of ballots that need to be certified.

— CARLI TEPROFF

8:26 A.M., SOUTHWEST REGIONAL LIBRARY IN PEMBROKE PINES

More than half of the voters here are finding that they are at the wrong precinct, even though they have voted here previously. They claim they no longer want to vote because of the inconvenience.

Miami-Dade County redrew some of its boundaries, which has led to confusion this morning.

Those who can vote here like Scott Horowitz, 48, found that voting was smooth and quick.

Horowitz, a Democrat. supports the medical marijuana amendment and the $800 million school bond.

"It's beneficial for the economy," he said.

— CRYSTAL CHEW

8:20 A.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

Precinct changes may be confusing some voters this morning. As explained in our Election Day FAQ, Broward redrew all of its districts in 2013. This year, Miami-Dade redrew boundaries for 6 percent of registered voters. Those voters registered in Miami-Dade should have received two notifications in the mail.

— PATRICIA MAZZEI

8:08 A.M., JOHN F. KENNEDY LIBRARY IN HIALEAH

There's a campaign worker screaming at voters as they exit their cars to vote for Frank Bocanegra, an attorney running for Miami-Dade County court judge Group 19. She has a bullhorn in her hand, but she doesn't need it.

Oski Gonzalez, 46, is a registered Democrat, but he voted for Rick Scott. He’s no big fan of either candidate.

"They're both scumbags," he said. "Rick Scott is a businessman and Charlie Crist is vain. But I voted for the one I thought would be best."

Gonzalez, a deejay and event promoter, said the main reason he went out to vote was to support the medical marijuana amendment.

"There are a lot of people who are sick, and I think there's a lot medical marijuana can help with," he said.

He voted in favor of the FIU expansion and said the youth fair can find somewhere else to go.

"It's a university," he said. "Do you want a bunch of kids riding fair rides or do you want kids to be educated?"

— ALEXI CARDONA

8:00 A.M., MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

According to the Miami-Dade County Elections Department, Miami-Dade precincts opened on time.

— CARLI TEPROFF

7:45 A.M., DORAL

Joanne Chiari, 53, voted for Rick Scott. She says she has seen "Florida flourish" and wants to "continue to see it rise. "

“Rick Scott is awesome. He is a job creator. I've seen him bring up the market and bring relief to many people," Chiari said.

Chiari also voted in the Doral’s municipal election. She voted for Pete Cabrera because it's a name she knew.

"I know friends who have dealt with him, and from what I hear he's a great guy," she said. "The drama that's among the present mayor and councilwomen has to stop. That's why I voted Pete."

Chiari voted no on the medical marijuana amendment, yes on the expansion for FIU, and no on the courthouse ballot question.

— MONIQUE MADAN

7:43 A.M., WEST KENDALL REGIONAL LIBRARY

At the West Kendall Regional Library, about 20 people lined up to vote before the polls opened, but many of these voters were sent away to other locations because districts changed.

Anne Bello, a Hammocks resident, had been waiting in line since 6 a.m. but could not vote in that location.

"These are tactics to get people not to vote," she said.

Likewise, Hammocks resident Mirna Obando, 42, arrived before polls opened and came out a half hour later, with a ticket indicating her designated location.

She had always voted at the library, but poll workers told her that locations changed this year.

"They said the districts changed and I have to go to Olive Hoover Elementary," she said. "It's very inconvenient. They're going to lose a lot of voters."

— REBECA PICCARDO

7:42 A.M., BROWARD COUNTY

According to the Broward County Supervisor of Elections Office, Broward precincts opened on time.

— AMY SHERMAN

7:32 A.M., JOHN F. KENNEDY LIBRARY IN HIALEAH

Hialeah is quiet this morning, with just a few voters trickling in and out before heading to work.

Alfredo Cioffi, a priest at Immaculate Conception Church in Hialeah, voted for Rick Scott.

"He's done good work in the time he's been office," he said. "I support him in his decisions."

Cioffi, 62, is also a professor of biology and bioethics at St. Thomas University. He voted against the medical marijuana amendment.

"The substances in marijuana with medicinal properties should be extracted and used in that form," he said. "Not the marijuana itself."

Cioffi voted against FIU expansion, which he said was difficult for him to do as an alumnus. He said expansion should not happen at the cost of the youth fair. He also voted in favor of funding a new court house.

"It's one of our prime historic buildings," he said.

— ALEXI CARDONA

7:26 A.M., FROST MUSEUM OF SCIENCE

As a transplant from California, Annette Quintiro felt Florida's voting process was not as straightforward when she voted at the Frost Museum of Science in Coconut Grove.

"I found the process confusing," said Quintiro, 36. "There's more than one precinct and they give you a ballot that is in more than one language. They also don't give you a receipt for voting."

Now a Coconut Grove resident, Quintiro is a teacher and voted for Charlie Crist for governor with education in mind.

"I believe we stand a better chance with our fundamentally flawed education in Florida."

— JACQUELINE SALO

7:23 A.M., SOUTHWEST REGIONAL LIBRARY IN PEMBROKE PINES

Out of about 20 people who arrived at Southwest Regional Library promptly at 7 a.m., half of them walked out angrily.

Unable to vote because of a change in precinct that they were not notified about, they rushed off in a hurry.

Some stated that they were sent to Southwest Regional Library from Rose G. Price Park just to be sent back to original Price park where they came from.

— CRYSTAL CHEW

7:05 A.M., SOUTH MIAMI-DADE

About 25 voters lined up outside the doors of the South Dade Regional Library to cast their ballots.

Among them was Jorge Santiago, 43, a Cutler Bay resident who has never voted before.

"I'm not here to vote for these Mickey Mouse candidates. I'm out here to make history by voting for Amendment No. 2," Santiago said of the medical marijuana question.

— MATIAS OCNER

7 A.M., SOUTH FLORIDA

It’s unlikely you’ll get wet if you’re heading to vote Tuesday, but your hair might be toussled. The forecast calls for party sunny skies, with lows in the low-70s and highs in the low-80s, with breezey conditions. Rain chance is 20 percent.

“Weather is cooperating. Dry for now,” said CBS4 meteorologist Lissette Gonzalez. Expect a few showers later in the day, she said.

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