World

Italian coffee pot tycoon’s ashes placed in giant cafetera

Father Pietro Segato, parish priest of Casale Corte Cerro, dispenses incense in front of a coffee pot containing the ashes of Renato Bialetti during his burial service in the church of Casale Corte Cerro, Northern Italy, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016.
Father Pietro Segato, parish priest of Casale Corte Cerro, dispenses incense in front of a coffee pot containing the ashes of Renato Bialetti during his burial service in the church of Casale Corte Cerro, Northern Italy, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. AP

A giant coffee pot served as an urn for the the man responsible for popularizing its famous stove-top design.

Renato Bialetti’s ashes were placed in a stove-top espresso maker, also known as a cafetera, during his burial ceremony Tuesday in Northern Italy.

Bialetti had expressed his wish to be cremated and buried in a Moka coffee maker, which his father Alfonso invented in 1933.

Although Bialetti was not its inventor, he was was credited with the marketing campaign that made the Moka brand an icon of Italian design.

Bialetti died last week at the age of 93.

The Moka has been displayed in museums such as the Museum Of Modern Art and many others all over the world. The coffee pot is common in Italy and Latin American countries.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

  Comments