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Secret Service Director Julia Pierson resigns amid criticism

In this photo taken Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, Secret Service Director Julia Pierson appears before the House Oversight Committee as it examines details surrounding a security breach at the White House when a man climbed over a fence, sprinted across the north lawn and dash deep into the executive mansion before finally being subdued, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pierson, a 30 year veteran of the Secret Service, resigned Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014, amid intense scrutiny and revelations of several security lapses.
In this photo taken Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, Secret Service Director Julia Pierson appears before the House Oversight Committee as it examines details surrounding a security breach at the White House when a man climbed over a fence, sprinted across the north lawn and dash deep into the executive mansion before finally being subdued, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pierson, a 30 year veteran of the Secret Service, resigned Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014, amid intense scrutiny and revelations of several security lapses. AP

Secret Service Director Julia Pierson resigned Wednesday amid mounting congressional criticism and as new revelations of agency lapses convinced President Barack Obama it was time for new leadership.

Joseph Clancy, a former special agent in charge of the Presidential Protective Division of the Secret Service who retired in 2011, was named as acting agency director.

Pierson, the first woman to head the elite agency that provides protection to presidents, former presidents and would-be presidents, offered her resignation less than two weeks after a man armed with a knife scrambled over a White House fence and made it inside the executive mansion.

Obama called Pierson and thanked her for more than 30 years with the service, White House press secretary Josh Earnest said. He noted that Pierson at a congressional hearing on Tuesday held herself accountable for the security breach and pledged it wouldn’t happen again.

“She took responsibility for the shortcomings of the agency that she led, and she took responsibility for fixing them,” Earnest said. “That, quite simply, I think, is a testament to her professionalism and to her character.”

But Earnest added that as more revelations about Secret Service problems were revealed, “The president concluded that new leadership of the agency was required.” He said Obama has no timeline for selecting a new director.

As Pierson was testifying Tuesday, reports surfaced that agency protocols failed during Obama’s recent trip to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The Washington Examiner and The Washington Post reported that Obama apparently shared an elevator with a security contractor who was carrying a gun and had three criminal convictions for assault and battery on his record.

The White House did not learn about the Atlanta incident “until shortly before it was reported,” Earnest said.

Pierson submitted her resignation to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, who said he will back a review “by a distinguished panel of independent experts” to look at White House security and “related issues.” He said the members would be named shortly and would submit recommendations to him by Dec. 15.

Johnson said he would also ask the panel for recommendations for potential new Secret Service directors, including recommendations for candidates “who come from outside the Secret Service.”

Johnson said he’d ask the panel to advise him whether it believes there should be a review of “broader issues concerning the Secret Service,” but he added that security at the White House would be the group’s “primary and immediate priority.”

Deputy Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas will take over an ongoing investigation into the fence-jumping incident at the White House and report his findings by Nov. 1, Johnson said.

Pierson’s resignation came as the man who scaled the fence, Omar Gonzalez, 42, appeared in a federal court. He pleaded not guilty to charges of unlawfully entering a restricted building while carrying a dangerous weapon, carrying a dangerous weapon outside a home and unlawful possession of ammunition. He was ordered to remain held in jail.

Pierson, whom Obama appointed to the post in 2013 in hopes of restoring confidence in an agency that had been rattled by a prostitution scandal, told Congress that the agency’s “security plan was not executed properly” and pledged reform.

But lawmakers appeared uneasy with Pierson’s ability to fix the agency, and she faced mounting pressure Wednesday to show results or step down.

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