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Grandma was cooking fish when 11-year-old visited. The smell killed him, family says

Camron Jean-Pierre, 11, died from a fish allergy while visiting the Bronx home of his grandmother, who was cooking cod. The New York Police Department says it appears he died from the smell of it being cooked.
Camron Jean-Pierre, 11, died from a fish allergy while visiting the Bronx home of his grandmother, who was cooking cod. The New York Police Department says it appears he died from the smell of it being cooked. Screengrab from Daily News Twitter

When Camron Jean-Pierre visited his grandmother’s house on New Year’s Day, he walked into the smell of fish being cooked.

And that smell killed the 11-year-old boy, who is allergic to fish, his dad, Steven Jean-Pierre, told the New York Post.

“It just so happens they was cooking it when we came in,” Steven Jean-Pierre told the Post. “Usually he don’t get nothing that severe.”

The New York Police Department says it was just before 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday when they received a call about “an unconscious person” at a home in Brooklyn, New York City, according to WPIX11.

It was during a New Year’s Day party hosted by Camron’s grandmother, according to the New York Daily News. As the boy gasped for air, his father called 911 and tried to keep him breathing by using a nebulizer, which helps administer medicine during an asthma attack.

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology warns people with allergies to “stay out of areas where fish is being cooked, as proteins may be released into the air during cooking.”

Camron’s dad recounted the last words his 11-year-old uttered to him before dying, as reported by the New York Post.

“Daddy, I love you,” Steven Jean-Pierre told the Post. “He gave me two kisses.”

New NIH guidelines mark a major shift in dietary advice. The guidelines are based on landmark research that found exposure to peanuts in the first year of life lowers a baby's chances of becoming allergic.

As he waited for an ambulance to arrive and take his son to Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center, Steven Jean-Pierre said “it felt like (Camron) had no pulse,” according to the Daily News.

“I tried to give him the CPR and he came back but I wish I knew (how) to keep pumping him because he woke up and I felt his heart and everything,” he told the Daily News. “But I stopped and sat him up to make him feel better.”

The boy was pronounced dead at the hospital later that evening, according to CBS New York. “His cause of death remains under investigation,” according to WPIX11.

The boy’s dad is mourning the loss of his “prince.”

“My son was the best,” Steven Jean-Pierre told the Post. “He made everyone around him happy. He made his dad happy.”

Now, Steven Jean-Pierre is left with videos and pictures of his son — including a collage he put together for Camron’s 11th birthday.

“Who knew it was going to be the last video I made of Camron?” a crying Steven Jean-Pierre told the Daily News. “Who knew that?”

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