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Man fired gun for New Year’s — then shot the neighbor who complained, Ohio cops say

Matthew Martin, 29, was arrested on charges of felonious assault in the New Year’s shooting incident, according to police.
Matthew Martin, 29, was arrested on charges of felonious assault in the New Year’s shooting incident, according to police. Columbus Division of Police

A man in Columbus, Ohio, asked his neighbor to stop shooting his gun in celebration of the New Year, and ended up getting shot himself, according to police.

Police were called to a house in Columbus just minutes after midnight New Year’s Day on reports that a man had been shot, the department said in a Facebook post on Wednesday.

Officers arrived, and the man told them his neighbor shot him after he told the man “to stop shooting his gun for New Year’s Eve,” police said. The bullet broke the man’s collar bone.

Police went to the nearby house and saw “a large number of people” inside, but no one responded to officers’ attempts to make contact — so police called in the SWAT team.

“Due to the scene size, number of people in the house and the need to call SWAT, nearly every car on the zone and all of the supervisors responded to help out,” Sgt. Cory Canter said in a statement posted to Facebook.

Police said it took three wagons to detain everyone at the house.

Matthew Martin, 29, was arrested on charges of felonious assault, according to police.

He’s being held at the Franklin County Jail, and was expected to appear in court on Wednesday, according to online jail records.

Across the country, police warn revelers every year about the dangers of celebratory gunfire on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.

But many don’t heed the warnings, McClatchy reported on Tuesday: A Kansas man accidentally shot himself in the stomach as he got ready to fire a celebratory shot this week, and an Ohio man inadvertently shot himself in the calf, according to local news reports. Shots fired into the air in California and Georgia hit children.

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“Bullets fired into the air return to the earth at up to 300 feet per second,” Saginaw, Michigan, police wrote on Facebook on New Year’s Eve. “Also a bullet fired into the air can land anywhere in a 2 mile radius.”

Every New Year's people watch the ball drop at Times Square, shoot of fireworks and search for a New Year's kiss but where do these traditions come from. (Video by Candi Bolden Music by Getty Music)

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