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Epic ‘reply-all’: Potluck invite goes to 25,000 Utah state workers — who keep replying

An invitation to a holiday potluck accidentally sent to 25,000 Utah state employees sparked a chain of reply-all emails — many asking people not to hit reply all — that flooded inboxes Friday, reported state officials.
An invitation to a holiday potluck accidentally sent to 25,000 Utah state employees sparked a chain of reply-all emails — many asking people not to hit reply all — that flooded inboxes Friday, reported state officials. Twitter

Someone mistakenly sent a potluck invite to 25,000 Utah state employees — nearly the entire state workforce — Friday, reported KUTV. Then the reply-all emails began.

“So this is happening right now. It’s Replyall-gate 2018. Adventures in state government,” wrote Utah public information office Joe Dougherty on Twitter about 9:30 a.m. Friday.

His post included a long chain of reply-all emails to the 25,000 recipients of the errant invite. Many begged fellow respondents to stop hitting reply-all, while others resorted to all-caps demands to “STOP THE MADNESS.”

“I … want to die,” reported one state worker on Twitter, while another reported receiving 51 reply-all emails to the invite in mere minutes.

Even Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox commented on the fiasco on Twitter, calling it “an emergency.”

“This is real and it’s an emergency,” Cox wrote. “Started out as a potluck and $5 white elephant gift exchange in one department and someone accidentally cc’d every state employee. I fear this will never end.”

But by 11:10 a.m. Friday, the flood of reply-all emails seemed to be abating, Dougherty reported on Twitter.

“Ok. It’s 11:10 am and I think it’s safe to say the great #ReplyAll disaster of 2018 is finally over. Thank you for playing!” he wrote.

“A reply all broadcast storm is the closest we’ll get to perpetual energy,” commented one observer on Twitter.

Wichita resident Fredrick Haines gave more than $110,00 to an email scam. Haines took part in the scam for several years. A settlement through the Justice Department is helping him get some of his money back.

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