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Mangled truck landed on a car, photos show. Cops explain how it could’ve been worse

A crash captured on photographs in Yavapai County, Arizona, shows a truck on top of a car — but no one was injured because everyone inside had been wearing seatbelts, police say.
A crash captured on photographs in Yavapai County, Arizona, shows a truck on top of a car — but no one was injured because everyone inside had been wearing seatbelts, police say. Yavapai County Sheriff's Office

If you need another reminder to wear seatbelts, police say a jarring crash in Arizona might just do the trick.

The Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office took to Facebook to share pictures of the crash, which ended with a mangled truck standing on top of a squished car. The accident happened on Sunday night, police say, and it left a scene that seemed “right out (of) Hollywood.”

But it could have been much worse, police say, as no one in either the truck or car suffered any injuries.

The reason for that? Everyone was wearing seatbelts, police say.

“This is the second accident this week where the use of seatbelts has helped avert a tragedy,” the police department wrote on Facebook, “and firefighters would once again like to remind everyone that the use of this simple device saves lives daily.”

A woman was driving the white truck north on Williamson Valley Road on Sunday evening when the driver of a black truck slammed into her, according to police. She then drove into oncoming traffic after losing control, police say, and hit a black car.

That caused the truck to flip while flying in the air and land wheels-down on a red car, police say.

“There were two occupants in the red sedan, and one each in the black car and white truck,” the police wrote. “Most remarkable, no one was injured in this incident.”

Police say they are still searching for the black trucker’s driver, who is accused of fleeing the scene after causing the crash.

Seat belts saved the lives of an estimated 14,668 people in 2016, according to The National Highway and Safety Administration, which estimates that about 27.5 million U.S. citizens don’t use them while driving in the car.

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