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Fox host threatens to run against ‘disgraceful’ GOP senator after Kavanaugh vote

Conservative political commentator Laura Ingraham speaks during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in 2016. Senator Murkowski of Alaska was the one Republican senator to vote against advancing Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, prompting Ingraham to muse about running against her.
Conservative political commentator Laura Ingraham speaks during the third day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in 2016. Senator Murkowski of Alaska was the one Republican senator to vote against advancing Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, prompting Ingraham to muse about running against her. AP

Fox News host Laura Ingraham mused about running against the one Republican senator who voted against moving forward on Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination on Friday — and former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin weighed in, too.

Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska broke with her party on the vote, and had been one of a handful of GOP senators who was on the fence about Kavanaugh’s nomination. Only one Democrat, Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, voted to advance the nomination.

“I like Alaska ... a lot,” Ingraham wrote in a tweet following the procedural vote. “Maybe it’s time to run for Senate after all.”

Ingraham went on to say that Murkowski “has abandoned all principles of due process and fairness.”

“Disgraceful,” Ingraham said, ending her message with the the hashtag #ConfirmKavanaugh.

Ingraham hosts “The Ingraham Angle” on the cable network nightly at 10 p.m. eastern time, as well as hosting “The Laura Ingraham Show” on the radio in the morning from 9 a.m. to noon eastern time, according to her Twitter bio. She also runs the conservative website LifeZette.com.

According to her website, Ingraham lives in the Washington, D.C., area with her children. She grew up in Connecticut and attended law school at the University of Virginia, where she drove a car with a “FARRIGHT” vanity license plate, the New York Times reports. She does not appear to have connections to Alaska.

Palin, a former governor of Alaska, also blasted off a tweet directed at Murkowski.

“I can see 2022 from my house ...,” Palin wrote.

Kavanaugh’s nomination process was rocked last month when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, a professor who lives in California, came forward accusing the judge of sexually assaulting her while the two were in high school in suburban Washington, D.C. That led to a day-long Senate hearing in which Kavanaugh denied the allegations, and a supplemental FBI investigation that further delayed the vote on his nomination.

Murkowski wasn’t the only Senate Republican to get a shoutout from Ingraham on Twitter Friday. She lavished praise on Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, another Republican who had been undecided before the vote, but who ultimately voted to advance the nomination.

Ingraham called Collins “fair-minded” and said conservatives should “appreciate her courage in the face of bullies and intimidation squads.”

Collins announced on Friday in a Senate floor speech that she would support Kavanaugh when the final votes comes up.

Murkowski explained her rationale to reporters after the vote — and said she didn’t fully make up her mind till she walked onto the Senate floor on Friday, the New York Times reports.

“I have been wrestling to really try to know what is fair and what is right, and the truth is, that none of this has been fair,” Murkowski said, according to the Times. “This hasn’t been fair to the judge, but I also recognize that we need to have institutions that are viewed as fair and if people who are victims, people who feel that there is no fairness in our system of government, particularly in our courts, then you’ve gone down a path that is not good and right for this country.”

The senator called her Kavanaugh vote “the most difficult evaluation of a decision that I have ever had to make,” according to the Times.

Sen. Susan Collins, from Maine, told protesters outside her office she would vote “yes” in a procedural vote to move Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination for Supreme Court Justice forward on October 5. They responded by yelling “no.”

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