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Park visitor thought she found a bit of glass. It was a 2.63-carat diamond, officials say

An Aurora, Colorado, woman discovered a 2.63 carat white diamond at Arkansas’s Crater of Diamond State Park after just ten minutes of hunting with her husband, son and grandkids, park officials said.
An Aurora, Colorado, woman discovered a 2.63 carat white diamond at Arkansas’s Crater of Diamond State Park after just ten minutes of hunting with her husband, son and grandkids, park officials said. Arkansas State Parks

Scraping through the dirt at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas, a 71-year-old woman spotted something shiny on the ground.

Park officials said Wednesday that the retiree from Aurora, Colorado, at first assumed her discovery was a bit of glass, KAIT reports.

“It was just lying on the surface,” said the woman, who asked to remain anonymous, according to the TV station.

That was just 10 minutes into the woman’s hunt for precious stones this month with her family, so she passed the stone to a family member and kept searching alongside her husband, son and grandchildren, KATV reports.

Another hour went past, and then the family brought their find to park staff — and learned it wasn’t a shard of glass at all: It was a 2.63-carat white diamond, making it the largest unearthed at the state park yet this year, the Arkansas Democrat Gazette reports.

Park staff said the woman was “shocked,” according to the Democrat Gazette.

Even better, the diamond is hers for good.

“The policy here is ‘finders, keepers,’ ” according to the state park’s website.

Park interpreter Waymon Cox said the stone, streaked with brown marks, was roughly “the size of a pinto bean” and “shaped somewhat like a fingernail,” the newspaper reports.

“About one out of every five diamonds registered by park visitors is found right on top of the ground, including many of the largest ever found at the Crater of Diamonds,” Cox said, according to KFSM. “Like other rocks and minerals, no two diamonds are exactly alike.”

The park has registered 256 diamonds this year, the Democrat Gazette reports.

Park officials said the woman named the diamond “Lichtenfels” after her hometown in Germany, according to the Democrat Gazette. The word, in German, means “a rock between two lights.”

The family attributed its good luck to the children’s interest in the park.

“She wouldn’t have come to the park if it weren’t for her grandkids,” the woman’s son said, according to KAIT.

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