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7-year-old drank some cappuccino. Then the hallucinations started, Louisiana cops say

A Thibodaux, Louisiana, man was arrested after police said he put the drug molly in a cappuccino he left unattended and that a boy, 7, drank — giving the boy hallucinations.
A Thibodaux, Louisiana, man was arrested after police said he put the drug molly in a cappuccino he left unattended and that a boy, 7, drank — giving the boy hallucinations. AP

Caffeine wasn’t the only stimulant in this cappuccino.

A 7-year-old in Thibodaux, Louisiana, was taken to a local hospital on July 12 after the child began hallucinating and acting out of sorts, according to the Thibodaux police.

Hospital staff began testing the child, and made an alarming discovery: There were methamphetamines in the 7-year-old’s system, police said. More exhaustive testing revealed that the child’s body had high levels of amphetamines as well.

That’s when police got involved — and after investigating for weeks, they have announced the arrest of Kenneth Hickman, 30, on suspicion of cruelty to a juvenile.

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Kenneth Hickman, 30 Thibodaux Police Department

On July 11, the 7-year-old had unknowingly been drinking a drugged cappuccino that Hickman left unattended in the home, police said.

The 7-year-old didn’t know who the drink belonged to — let alone that Hickman had popped open a capsule of the party drug molly and dumped the synthetic drug into the cappuccino, according to police. (Molly is a powder or crystal incarnation of MDMA, which is also known as ecstasy.)

Officers interviewed Hickman on July 25, and he admitted that he had mixed the drug into his cappuccino, according to police. He also told authorities that “this practice is his common method to consume the drug,” police said.

Hickman further confessed that he wasn’t keeping an eye on the drugged beverage after he poured in the molly, police said.

Police then got an arrest warrant for Hickman and took him into custody. He’s being held at the Lafourche Parish Detention Center on $5,000 bond, police said.

Deadly doses of MDMA are rare, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

But that doesn’t mean the drug isn’t dangerous, the agency warns: It can lead to high blood pressure, panic attacks, seizures and faintness.

After a two-month investigation, Fresno police seized 150 pounds of cannabis-infused edibles, including those packaged as candies. Chief Jerry Dyer expressed concern of such candies falling into the hands of children.

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