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People at this restaurant are armed and ready to fend off seagulls — with water guns

Toby Evans, the owner of 3Sheets restaurant in Perth, Australia, said seagulls have harassed customers at his establishment — so he has armed each table with a water gun to fend off the hungry birds. And so far, he said, it has worked.
Toby Evans, the owner of 3Sheets restaurant in Perth, Australia, said seagulls have harassed customers at his establishment — so he has armed each table with a water gun to fend off the hungry birds. And so far, he said, it has worked. Screenshot from PerthNow video

Dinner at the 3Sheets restaurant in Perth, Australia, also comes with a side of armed conflict.

Well, kind of.

Toby Evans told CBC that seagulls have harassed people at his coastal establishment — and it has only gotten worse in the past few weeks. He theorized that perhaps the birds have been training to swoop down and steal meals from unsuspecting customers.

"It's like they went to commando school and learned some tricks," he told CBC. "They were just getting pretty aggressive towards the the customers."

So the restaurant owner has armed each table with a water gun to fend off the hungry birds, as reported by Reuters.

And so far, Evans said, the experiment has been a success.

"People are defending their dinner and it's worked so far," he said in an interview with News.com.au. "After all the tragedies we've had recently it's nice to have something with a bit of fun."

The "aggressive" seagulls grew particularly adept at snatching snacks from the plates of children, Evans told ABC, and it was starting to keep customers away from his pizzeria. He decided to make a trip to Toys 'R' Us and purchase one super soaker for each table.

We rigged up a Go-Pro to the bottom of a tray full of Cheetos to see what it looks like when seagulls mob for food. It wasn’t quite the Hitchcock experience, but it is pretty cool.

And how did people react to the change?

"They love it, especially the blokes, they will sit down with a meal and a beer and they get into the spirit of it," he told ABC. "The customers appreciate that we are trying to do as much as we can and the customers seem to enjoy it."

He did concede, however, that there were a few people who voiced displeasure with solution and complained it was inhumane. He described them as "do gooders" and "Facebook warriors." But in his interview with News.com.au, Evans explained that he bought fake hawks, fake owls and other "humane" ways to keep the airborne thieves from pestering customers.

Yet none of that worked, and one day the magic bullet for his problem popped in his head, Evans told CBC.

"I just had this epiphany one morning and thought: water pistols," he said. "It ticked all the boxes."

The restaurant owner argued to ABC that spraying the gulls with water isn't harmful, as the birds live right off the ocean.

And it's a great way to teach them a lesson, he said.

"We can scare them off a bit and have some fun and the kids love it," he told ABC. "It's also training the seagulls to tell them 'you are not welcome here guys, go and get your own food, go to the ocean where you belong'."

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