National

The ‘robber’ was an actor. Cops didn’t know, so they shot at him, video shows

Indiana cop shoots at actor holding prop gun

Police in Crawfordsville, Indiana released body camera footage showing an officer firing at an actor who was filming a movie in the city on Sept. 26. Police were responding to a 911 call reporting a robbery in progress. The actor was filming a rob
Up Next
Police in Crawfordsville, Indiana released body camera footage showing an officer firing at an actor who was filming a movie in the city on Sept. 26. Police were responding to a 911 call reporting a robbery in progress. The actor was filming a rob

Indiana police have released body camera footage showing an officer shooting a live round at a man he thought was robbing a bar, but who was actually an actor playing a robber while filming a movie.

The Crawfordsville, Ind. police officer approaches the door to the bar, and when he sees the man he shouts at the man to drop his weapon, video shows.

“Drop the gun! Drop the gun now!” the officer yells.

But the actor appears not to immediately drop the gun.

Then the officer shoots a live round at the actor, who pulls off the mask he’s wearing.

“We’re doing a movie!” the actor shouts, his hands in the air.

“Excuse me?” the officer says, instructing the actor to step back.

No one was injured, according to CBS Chicago. The actor was taken into custody, but was later released.

“When you’re told to do something, the one thing you don’t do is turn towards police while you’re holding a gun,” Sgt. Kim Riley of the Indiana State Police told the media.

Police had been called to Backstep Brewery by someone who reported seeing a man in a ski mask enter the bar armed with a firearm. But the masked man was, in reality, an actor named Jim Duff who was working on a movie project.

The problem was that Sgt. Matt Schroeter, who was responding to the incident, had no idea the man he saw holding a weapon and backing out of the bar wasn’t an actual criminal. Police told FOX 59 that the production company and the bar did not warn law enforcement that a movie was being shot there.

Compounding the confusion was the fact that most of the film crew was inside the bar, not outside, where the officer was. So from the officer’s perspective, movie equipment wasn’t apparent.

And for the film crew inside the situation was just as confusing.

“We could not see the police, so when the actor left the building we had no knowledge any police had even arrived at the scene,” Montgomery County Movies owner Philip Demoret told FOX59.

Montgomery County Prosecutor Joe Buser looked over the evidence in the case and announced Monday that he has decided not to file charges against any of the parties involved in the shooting, according to the Journal & Courier.

“We ask, for obvious safety purposes, that our department be notified of future instances where toy or prop weapons are going to be used,” city officials wrote in a statement last week.

  Comments