Crime

Miami-Dade cops offer active shooter scenario on neighborhood app

Authorities search for a suspect following a shooting that killed multiple people at a social services facility Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015, in San Bernardino, Calif.
Authorities search for a suspect following a shooting that killed multiple people at a social services facility Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2015, in San Bernardino, Calif. AP

The video is almost four minutes of pulsating bass beats, people cowering under desks and hiding in closets and police securing buildings with high-powered weapons. A voice refers to past mass shootings at Virginia Tech University and in Fort Hood, Texas.

It preaches leaving personal items behind during an active shooting event, following instructions from law enforcement and identifying escape routes. Overpowering a shooter is suggested as a final action if there is no chance of getting away.

And now the video, on the heels of the Paris terror attacks and this week’s mass casualty shooting in San Bernardino, is making its way to your neighborhood.

This week, Miami-Dade police began using the social networking app Nextdoor to spread the word on how to stay safe if terror comes to your neighborhood. The app, created about a decade ago by a group in Oakland, California, has become a popular tool for neighbors to inform each other about street closings, yard sales and kitten litters.

It’s also become a tool that police use to inform specific neighborhoods of street closings and criminal activity. And Thursday, even as federal agents continued to seek clues to the San Bernardino massacre, Miami-Dade police Maj. Hector Llevat posted the Homeland Security video entitled “Options for Consideration Active Shooter Training Video” on Nextdoor apps throughout communities in Miami-Dade.

“In light of the recent events, the Miami-Dade Police Department asks you to consider possible actions to take if confronted with an active shooter scenario,” Llevat wrote. “Please take a few minutes to view this video provided by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.”

The Nextdoor app also gives residents the chance to comment — and comments weren’t in short supply. Some thanked the police for relaying information. Others said they felt quite protected inside their own homes.

“Scary but helpful information. Thanks,” commented a man from Miami Shores.

A nearby Shorecrest resident said he’s not only prepared — he’s ready for the real thing.

“I have my CCW [concealed or open carry permit] and carry a SIG [handgun] and go to the range and play out multiple scenarios. My wife and daughter are also both trained and we have had the family meeting and know what to do if the situation arises,” wrote the Shorecrest resident. “I personally would feel bad, though, if confronted and the situation turns out to be one of those FEMA crisis drills like several others have been.”

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