Crime

Killer of Miami FedEx delivery woman heads to parole hearing

Joseph Ramirez in prison for the murder of a FedEx employee in December 1983. He will appear before a parole commission on Wednesday.
Joseph Ramirez in prison for the murder of a FedEx employee in December 1983. He will appear before a parole commission on Wednesday.

Joseph Ramirez, who went to trial four times for the savage murder of a Key Biscayne FedEx delivery woman on Christmas Eve 1983, is being considered for parole.

Florida’s parole commission on Wednesday will consider whether Ramirez — who is serving three life terms — is eligible to be released from prison.

Ramirez, 56, was last convicted in 2007 for the murder of Mary Jane Minick Quinn, 27, whose bludgeoned and stabbed body was found inside a West Miami-Dade FedEx warehouse.

Florida no longer has a parole system, but a commission still exists to consider cases of inmates whose crimes predate the elimination of the program.

“He is a viscious animal who can never live again in a civilized society,” said Miami-Dade prosecutor Joseph Mansfield, who will appear before the commission in Tallahassee to argue against Ramirez’s potential release.

A commission social worker has recommended Ramirez not be released until May 2136.

Prosecutors said Ramirez, a janitor at the building, bashed her head in with a 65-pound fax machine before stabbing her 11 times. A medical examiner testified that Quinn was alive during the ordeal, dying as she tried to crawl away from Ramirez.

Missing from Quinn’s bag: $430 in cash.

The case against Ramirez was always circumstantial.

During the weeks before the attack, prosecutors said, Ramirez asked several employees about the amount of money coming into the office. The week before the murder, Quinn’s office keys vanished — and police found no evidence of a break-in that night.

A bloody fingerprint matched that of Ramirez, who claimed he was asleep at his girlfriend’s home that night. He also gave police shifting versions about what happened to the clothes he wore that night.

Ramirez also sent a letter from jail to the court in which he tried to explain the bloody fingerprint with bizarre stories about a prior injury and a used sanitary napkin.

But the most controversial evidence was science. Three times, the Florida Supreme Court overturned his trial convictions, questioning the testimony of a medical examiner who said a knife found in Ramirez's car must be the one used to kill Quinn.

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