Crime

Man charged with trying to kill 10 cops with rifle has schizophrenia, father says

Shawn Khosravi, whose 32-year-old son Aramis Khosravi stands accused of trying to kill 10 Miami-Dade police officers during a shootout, met with the media Thursday and explained how his son suffers from schizophrenia and never should have been permitted to get hold of a weapon.
Shawn Khosravi, whose 32-year-old son Aramis Khosravi stands accused of trying to kill 10 Miami-Dade police officers during a shootout, met with the media Thursday and explained how his son suffers from schizophrenia and never should have been permitted to get hold of a weapon. Charles Rabin, Miami Herald Staff

The man accused of trying to kill 10 Miami-Dade police officers during a shootout at his Kendall home has schizophrenia and should never have had access to the high-powered rifle police said he used during the exchange of gunfire, his father said.

No one was killed in the Tuesday night confrontation on the usually quiet Kendall street just west of Dadeland Mall. But three officers suffered minor injuries after being struck with shrapnel and debris while retreating, police said. The shooting ended when Aramis Khosravi, 32, put his weapon down and surrendered. He’s been charged with 10 counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer.

Standing before a gaggle of media on Thursday in front of his home at 8001 SW 89th Terr., Khosravi’s father, Shawn Khosravi, said the family had done everything within its ability — including notifying the state of his illness and taking guardianship of the younger Khosravi — to try to stop him from obtaining a weapon.

He offered an apology to his neighbors and thanked the Miami-Dade Police Department for acting professionally and not taking his son’s life.

“It is puzzling how he got access to the firearm after everything,” said Shawn Khosravi. “Those with mental illness do not think like you and I and don’t have the same mental capacity as you and I.”

Then he urged President Donald Trump and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis “to please pay close attention to the crisis of guns and mental illness in the community.”

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Aramis Khosrabi, 32, was charged with trying to kill 10 Miami-Dade police officers during a shootout Tuesday night. His father says the man is schizophrenic and never should have been able to obtain a weapon. He urged President Trump and Fla. Gov. Ron DeSantis to take action. Miami-Dade Corrections

Though the older Khosravi took some follow-up questions after his statement, he didn’t go into detail about exactly which state agency was warned of his son’s illness and his apparent fondness for weaponry. Khosravi said he never saw his son with the rifle he used Tuesday and didn’t know how he obtained it.

“But he has had possession of guns before. That’s what prompted us to take the action,” Shawn Khosravi said.

The father’s decision to speak publicly about his son comes at a particularly sensitive time after a series of mass shootings have lawmakers debating whether to enact background checks on weapon purchases, particularly to flag the mentally ill.

Miami-Dade Police Director Juan Perez said detectives are looking into whether Aramis Khosravi is listed on a state database for mental competency that could have warned a potential seller of his illness. They’re also still trying to learn where he obtained the assault weapon, which the director said was similar to an AK-47. Perez said Khosravi’s father got home while the scene was still active Tuesday and told officers about his son’s condition.

Miami-Dade police headed for the Khosravi home at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday after 911 lit up with calls about gunfire on the usually reserved street. Once there, they noticed two cars in the driveway and someone inside the home flicking lights on and off. When officers went around back, they said they noticed shell casings from a high-powered rifle, then entered the home.

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Bullet holes in the front window of the Khosravi home in Kendall where Aramis Khosravi is accused of trying to kill 10 Miami-Dade police officers during a shootout Tuesday night. Charles Rabin, Herald Staff Writer

Almost immediately, police said, Aramis Khosravi began firing at them. As they returned fire, they also retreated outside to safety. After a while Aramis Khosravi put his weapon down and surrendered. He was taken into custody and charged with 10 counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer. His bond was set at $100,000.

It’s still not clear what Khosravi was firing his weapon at before police arrived.

By Thursday, the only remnants on 89th Terrace of the Tuesday night firefight were three bullet holes in the front window of the Khosravi home. Otherwise the street was its same old quiet self.

“He’s not a violent person,” Shawn Khosravi said of his son. “He’s highly intelligent and a college graduate. This [mental illness and easy access to guns] is an ongoing crisis.”

Chuck Rabin, writing news stories for the Miami Herald for the past three decades, covers cops and crime. Before that he covered the halls of government for Miami-Dade and the city of Miami. He’s covered hurricanes, the 2000 presidential election and the Marjory Stoneman Douglas mass shooting. On a random note: Long before those assignments, Chuck was pepper-sprayed covering the disturbances in Miami the morning Elián Gonzalez was whisked away by federal authorities.
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