Crime

Florida man admitted to sexual contact with own children. He’ll be in prison for 30 years

Christopher Cumberland
Christopher Cumberland Broward County Sheriff's Office

A Central Florida resident who admitted to having sexual contact with “numerous minors including his own children” will spend the next 30 years behind bars, the Fort Lauderdale U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

Christopher Cumberland, 33, was sentenced to 365 months in prison Friday — slightly more than 30 years — after pleading guilty to attempting to entice a minor into sexual activity. A lifetime of supervision will await the Osceola County resident upon his release.

Court documents show Cumberland solicited underage sex in an online group forum entitled, “Little Boys for Daddy (18+).” He also sent more than 500 messages to an undercover FBI agent who pretended to have a 9-year-old son he was willing to prostitute.

On March 28, the agent contacted Cumberland and the two kept up communication over the next 13 days, the complaint affidavit said. Cumberland, wanting to perform a sex act on the child, agreed to meet the agent on April 10 in Coral Springs. He told the agent he would bring a number of items including the $25 payment, condoms and “Sour Patch” candy for the child.

Cumberland had all of these items when the authorities arrested him later that day.

While in custody, Cumberland admitted to driving from Kissimmee to Coral Springs to sexually abuse the agent’s son. He also revealed a history of “sexual contact with numerous minors including his own children” beginning when they were roughly 3 months old, according to court records.

Cumberland is being held at the Main Jail facility in Broward County.

The Department of Justice’s Project Safe Childhood, an initiative created to fight the growing epidemic of the sexual exploitation and abuse of minors, helped bring about Cumberland’s conviction.

C. Isaiah Smalls II is a reporter covering breaking and trending news for the Miami Herald. Previously, he worked for ESPN’s The Undefeated as part of their inaugural class of Rhoden Fellows. He is a graduate of both Columbia University and Morehouse College.
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