Crime

Drug gang tyrannized public housing area. 13 are off to new housing: federal prison

Flashing cash and dead bodies on social media, a cocaine-concentrated business gang of many names — Site 16 Blood Gang, Dub Side Blood Family, Smackville — tyrannized Allapattah’s South Gwen Cherry public housing residents for 15 years with swaggering violence.

But 10 convictions Friday plus three previous guilty pleas mean 13 gang members, including leaders Antonio Glass and Jerimaine Bryant, will have new permanent addresses in the public housing called “federal prison.”

That’s for the near future and, for most, the not-so-near future. Though most of those convicted Friday do have a range of sentencing possibilities, their convictions include either “racketeering conspiracy” (RICO) or “drug distribution conspiracy.” That can add great tonnage to their sentences.

It’s the kind of prosecutorial climax envisioned in May 2017 when the Operation Northern Light Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force announced federal indictments of 14 alleged gang members. The task force consists of federal agencies FBI, ATF, DEA and the U.S. Attorney’s Office assisted on the ground by Miami and Miami-Dade police departments.

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“The dismantlement of this violent organization has allowed for a major criminal element to be removed from the community of Allapattah,” DEA Special Agent in Charge Adolphus Wright said.

A Justice Department release stated “evidence at trial showed that the DSBF became so emboldened that they told a future homicide victim’s own mother that her son would be killed. The DSBF followed through on that promise with his subsequent murder. Similarly, trial evidence showed members of the group celebrated after killing another victim by posting images of the deceased’s body in a casket.”

Among the 14 indicted, only convicted murderer Quincy Bryant’s trial remains. Bryant, who did eight years in Florida prison for second degree murder, faces charges of racketeering, conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance, conspiracy to possess a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His trial begins Oct. 29.

As for those already convicted at trial or by plea:

Antonio Glass, 26, rose up to lead the gang when gang founder Isaac “Ike” Thompson went to prison in 2012. Glass was convicted of racketeering conspiracy, drug distribution conspiracy and possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His sentencing range is 10 years to life.

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Antonio Glass in his most recent Miami-Dade Corrections mugshot

Jerimaine Bryant, 33, supplied drugs to the gang and advice to Glass. Court papers say Bryant proudly identified himself as a gang captain and put a chart of underlings on social media. He went down on racketeering conspiracy, drug distribution conspiracy, and three counts of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His sentencing range is 20 years to life.

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Jerimaine Bryant before a prison term Florida Department of Corrections

Curtis Bryant, 30, a sales supervisor and seller who witnesses said got into the violence end of the business, was found guilty of racketeering conspiracy, drug distribution conspiracy, and attempted possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His sentencing range is 10 years to life.

Levi Bryant, 55, a career drug seller; this is his third drug-selling conviction. Court papers quoted a social media post by Jerimaine as saying, “My Uncle Fish (Levi Bryant) gave me the game, my Auntie Danielle showed me the way and ma n----- got me this far...” “Uncle Fish” was hooked on drug distribution conspiracy and possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His mandatory minimum is life.

Michael Walker, 21, was in sales and keeping the gang’s guns. He got convicted of racketeering conspiracy, drug distribution conspiracy, and possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His sentencing range is 10 years to life.

Reginald Graham, 22, was also in sales and keeping the gang’s guns. Like Walker he was convicted of racketeering conspiracy, drug distribution conspiracy and attempted possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His sentencing range is 10 years to life.

Mario Rodriguez, 28, was on probation for cocaine trafficking when this bust went down. Now, he’s got convictions for drug distribution conspiracy, possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. His sentencing range is 15 years to life.

Daniel Jones, 24, worked in sales and prosecutors say he tried to establish a connection to a high-grade marijuana producer in Colorado. Jones was found guilty of drug distribution conspiracy. His sentencing range is 10 years to life.

Torivis Ingram, 27, was a drug seller. He went down on drug distribution conspiracy and possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. His mandatory minimum is life.

Samuel Hayes, 25, was mainly in the muscle end of the gang, which also engaged in armed robbery. Hayes was found guilty of two racketeering conspiracy, possession of a firearm in furtherance of a crime of violence and two counts of robbery. His sentencing range is five years to life.

Donzell Jones, 32, is a veteran drug seller. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess a controlled substance with intent to distribute and has been sentenced to 15 years and eight months.

Vencess Toby, 45, is a drug seller. She pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess a controlled substance with intent to distribute and has been sentenced to five years.

Latitia Hauser, 45, supplied drugs and earned money via fraud. She pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess a controlled substance with intent to distribute. Hauser got sentenced Tuesday to four years, nine months in prison.

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