Miami Beach

Holocaust Education Week events to be held Feb. 22-26 in Miami Beach

The Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach at 1933-1945 Meridian Ave.
The Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach at 1933-1945 Meridian Ave. Miami Herald File

The Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach, 1933-1945 Meridian Ave., will host a series of events for Holocaust Education Week from Feb. 22-26. All programs are free and open to the public.

The purpose of the education week is to keep the Holocaust relevant to young people and to prevent another genocide.

“Without these educational events, these events are likely to repeat themselves. The Holocaust was murder at the industrial level. We seem to only care when it affects us. This reminds us that we always have to care,” said Andrew Hall, chairman of the Holocaust Memorial.

‘THE HOLOCAUST: HOW WAS IT HUMANLY POSSIBLE?’

The exhibit, The Holocaust: How Was It Humanly Possible? will open at the FIU College of Architecture + The Arts, located at Miami Beach Urban Studios, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 440. The opening will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and the exhibit will remain on display through March 4.

Presented by the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach, the exhibit focuses on those responsible for the events of the Holocaust and their collaborators. It also explores how the collaboration of the masses made the tragic events possible.

Dr. Marlene Yahalom, director of education for the American Society for Yad Vashem, will give a keynote address and lead a tour of the exhibit.

FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION: ‘SURVIVOR’

Survivor, a new Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach educational film, will screen for the first time in South Florida at 11:15 a.m. Tuesday at Miami Dade College, Homestead Campus, Building E, Room F222, 500 College Terr.

After the screening, local Holocaust survivors featured in the film, Henry Flescher and David Mermelstein, will participate in a panel discussion. Professor Randall Kaufman, who has led Miami Dade College’s Holocaust Education Program for the past eight years, will moderate the discussion.

PRIMO LEVI: THE SAVED WORD

Dr. Nicola Gavioli, a specialist in war and witness literature, will lead a presentation on the works of Primo Levi, an Italian writer and Holocaust survivor. Gavioli will read from some of his published works, including If This Is a Man, to examine his role as a witness to the events of the Holocaust and as a contemporary writer.

Without these educational events, these events are likely to repeat themselves. The Holocaust was murder at the industrial level. We seem to only care when it affects us. This reminds us that we always have to care.

Andrew Hall

FILM SCREENING: ‘NUMBERED’

Numbered, a film about Auschwitz survivors and the numbers that were tattooed on their arms, will be screened at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach. The film explores the relationship Auschwitz survivors and their children and grandchildren have with their numbers.

After the film, Dr. Miriam Kassenoff, a child survivor of the Holocaust, will lead a discussion on the film. Kassenoff serves as chairwoman of the Holocaust Education Committee of the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach.

PRESERVING YIDDISH CULTURE

Riva Ginsburg will discuss the history of Yiddish, a language that is associated with pre-war Europe, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25, at Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach.

Ginsburg, who was born in a displaced persons camp in Germany after the Holocaust, currently teaches at Florida Atlantic University. She will explore the history, human and wisdom of Yiddish, as well as the future of the language.

For more information about Holocaust Education Week or to register for any of the events, visit holocaustmemorialmiamibeach.org or call 305-538-1663.

‘DISCOVERING A NAZI LEGACY: ONE FAMILY’S STORY

In addition, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., invites the South Florida community to attend its 2016 Miami Community Event, “Discovering a Nazi Legacy: One Family’s Story,” on Monday at Temple Beth Sholom, 4144 Chase Ave., Miami Beach.

Chaired by Matthew L. Adler, the event will feature Jennifer Teege, bestselling author of My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Nazi Past. Teege will be interviewed on stage by museum historian Edna Friedberg, about the discovery she made at age 38 that her grandfather, Amon Goeth, was the brutal Nazi commandant of the Plaszow concentration camp, portrayed by actor Ralph Fiennes in the film Schindler’s List.

Contact the museum for ticket pricing at 561-995-6773 or southeast@ushmm.org. Also, you can register online at www.ushmm.org/events/teege-miami.

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