Miami Beach

Tides cause flooding in Miami Beach again Friday morning

Doorman Jose Salazar carries fellow employee Daysi Rodriguez over the tide water on Miami Beach on Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. They work at the Red South Beach Hotel.
Doorman Jose Salazar carries fellow employee Daysi Rodriguez over the tide water on Miami Beach on Friday, Oct. 9, 2015. They work at the Red South Beach Hotel. wmichot@miamiherald.com

Maria Posada had a doctor’s appointment Friday morning when the waters rose again.

“It’s gotten worse in the past few years,” said the 65-year-old South Beach resident, as cars and people sloshed through floodwaters nearby on Collins Avenue.

She’d left for her appointment by foot, but changed her mind after the high tide flooded the neighborhood around her condo just north of 29th Street. Several inches of water had pooled over the sidewalk and roadway by 8 a.m.

She had a bandaged toe due to a fall, and when the tide rose, she needed two carpenters working nearby to carry her to her front door.

“Thankfully they were there,” she said.

Another high tide came in about a foot higher than predicted Friday, according to preliminary measurements by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. Like on Thursday, the unusually high sea levels caused saltwater to seep through storm drains and over the seawall along Indian Creek Drive.

Pools of water formed in other flood-prone areas on the Beach until the tide receded within a few hours. Once again, sunny-day flooding made the coastal community an example of the problems with sea-level rise caused by climate change.

The weekend could be soggier than expected, too. The National Weather Service has issued a coastal flooding advisory for South Florida through 2 p.m. Sunday.

Scenes of tourists splashing across the sidewalk and a residents rushing to move their cars echoed the high tides from last week, but the past few days were unexpected.

“It wasn’t like this last year,” said Jennifer Hernandez, a supervisor at the Alden Hotel on Indian Creek Drive. She was handing guests trash bags to wrap around their legs as they stepped into the water in front of the hotel.

Some guests scrambled to move their cars. Others canceled reservations when they arrived, and others decided to check out early.

“We can’t control mother nature,” Hernandez said as she surveyed the wakes created by cars moving through the water.

Indian Creek Drive and Collins Avenue are state roads administered by the Florida Department of Transportation. Miami Beach officials placed temporary pumps in the area again to mitigate.

Joey Flechas: 305-376-3602, @joeflech

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