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A second raccoon with rabies extends alert in South Miami-Dade area

Florida man Ezra James was briefly jailed after a neighbor reported him for allegedly trapping and lighting a raccoon, like these, on fire for eating his mangoes. An officer arrived and shot the raccoon. James faces an animal cruelty charge.
Florida man Ezra James was briefly jailed after a neighbor reported him for allegedly trapping and lighting a raccoon, like these, on fire for eating his mangoes. An officer arrived and shot the raccoon. James faces an animal cruelty charge.

A second raccoon in South Miami-Dade has tested positive for rabies — and that means part of the Southwest Miami-Dade suburbia will be on a rabies alert until Sept. 2, another 60 days.

The alert area is bounded by Southwest 152nd Street on the north, 187th Street on the south, 117th Avenue on the east and 137th Avenue to the west. That doesn't include the main campus of Florida International University, though one person tweeted that he walked past a classroom and saw a raccoon "inside just chillin' ... acting like he paid tuition."

The Florida Department of Health in Miami-Dade reminds people that animals with rabies can infect other animals that haven't had their rabies shots. Rabies shots are atop the rabies prevention list from the health department, which also advises:

Watch your pets so they don't wind up getting bitten by a wild animal. Get your pet to the vet if it gets bitten and call Miami-Dade Animal Services at 311.

Report neighborhood stray dogs at 311. Or, if you need to get wildlife off your property, click here for a list of wildlife trappers.

Don't litter or leave overflowing garbage cans.

Don't leave pet food.

Stay away from stray and feral animals — that includes adopting them.

Keep bats out of your house, school and belfry.

If you're bitten or scratched by a wild animal, call the Department of Health at 305-324-2400.

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