Homestead - South Dade

It will be a busy election season in Homestead, with 10 people running for 3 seats

The City of Homestead’s election is now underway as the deadline for qualifying has closed. Eleven candidates have put their name in the running for the four open seats — mayor and council seats 2, 3 and 6.
The City of Homestead’s election is now underway as the deadline for qualifying has closed. Eleven candidates have put their name in the running for the four open seats — mayor and council seats 2, 3 and 6. City of Homestead

The city of Homestead’s election is now officially under way as the deadline for qualifying was Friday. Eleven candidates have put their name in the running for the four open seats — mayor and council seats 2, 3 and 6.

People in all four positions vote on ordinances and issues, while overseeing the entire city, unlike some other South Florida areas where council members or commissioners oversee certain districts.

Four candidates are running for mayor, three for council seat 2, three for council seat 3 and one for council seat 6. As the only candidate filing for seat 6, Patricia Fairclough, the incumbent, was automatically re-elected. Fairclough, 40, has served two terms.

Homestead will have a primary election Oct. 1, with a runoff on Nov. 5 for seats where no one won a majority of votes in the primary.

Mayor

Mayor Stephen Shelley, who has been mayor only since January, did not respond to requests for comment on why he didn’t enter the race.

Roy “Steve” Shiver, 53, was born and raised in Homestead and served as its mayor in 1997 to 2001. In the years that followed he served as Miami-Dade county manager, Opa-locka city manager and the executive director of Miami-Dade’s largest police union.

Jeffrey Duane Porter, 59, served as Homestead mayor for three consecutive terms before resigning in 2018 to run for Florida agriculture commissioner. He lost the state race. He also served as a City Council member from 1997 to 2007.

Bradley Lynn Compton has not held a Homestead government position, but is vice chairman of the Southeast Venture Community Development Districts, a taxing district that handles infrastructure and other matters for the Waterstone development.

Steven Daniel Losner, 58, served on the City Council from 2001-2007 and ran for mayor in 2011, but lost. He said he wants back into government because he is tired of seeing the same issues going unfixed.

Seat 2

Seat 2 Council Member Jon Burgess reached his term limit — 12 years — and is not eligible to run again.

Paul B. Wiggins Jr. , 36, is a “fourth generation Homesteadian” whose family has had a nursery business for decades. He plans to bring that experience to office by focusing on long-term change.

Dennis Ray Maytan, Jr., 52, is a former city Parks and Recreations director and retired after working in the department for about 30 years. Maytan says he was diagnosed with melanoma, a skin cancer. After surgery, he started trying to live his dream of running a campaign and winning a seat.

Sean Lee Fletcher, 47, is the security manager for Florida Power & Light’s Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station and has worked for FPL in various position for 22 years. His platform revolves around fixing public safety issues.

Seat 3

Incumbent Lawrence Leo Roth, 55, is running for reelection. He was first elected to the council in 2015 and is looking to win a second term.

Kim Hill, 55, has been a teacher for 15 years. He has attended most City Council meetings for the last three years to advocate for the use of body cameras by the Homestead Police Department.

William Robert Rea, 60, was a police officer for the Homestead Police Department, serving 25 years. He wants to focus on public safety and government transparency.

Miami Herald Real Time Reporter Devoun Cetoute covers breaking news, Florida theme parks and general assignment. He attends the University of Florida and grew up in Miami. Theme parks are on his mind in and out of the office.
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