Homestead - South Dade

You can’t see this rare crocodile in many places, but you can see it at Zoo Miami

A false gavial, a rare type of crocodile from Indonesia and Malaysia, hatched on Sept. 1 at Zoo Miami.
A false gavial, a rare type of crocodile from Indonesia and Malaysia, hatched on Sept. 1 at Zoo Miami.

Lockjaw and Nessi are officially parents.

The false gavials — a rare type of crocodile from Indonesia and Malaysia — produced an egg that successfully hatched at Zoo Miami on Sept. 1.

“It’s very rare for these types of crocodiles to hatch in captivity,” said Ron Magill, zoo spokesman.

Out of a clutch of 25 eggs, only one survived after 89 days of incubation at a temperature of 89 degrees.

This is the first time in more than 25 years that a false gavial hatched at the zoo, Magill said.

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A false gavial, a rare type of crocodile from Indonesia and Malaysia, hatched on Sept. 1 at Zoo Miami. Ron Magill/Zoo Miami

Lockjaw, who at 14 feet long is the biggest crocodile at the zoo, is a 45-year-old male that came to Zoo Miami in 2000 and is now on breeding loan. Nessi, who is 9 feet long, is 31 and returned to the zoo in 2010 after being lent to another zoo for breeding purposes.

False gavials, which are generally not dangerous to humans, are considered endangered because there are less than 2,500 in the wild, according to the zoo.

Magill said breeding crocodiles is an important part of what the zoo does.

“They are top-of-the-line predators and are very important to the health of the environment,” he said.

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